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CelticCelebrations

  • shutterstock 114601966 Pagan wheelTuesday 1st May is May Day and Beltane - a Celtic word meaning 'fires of Bel' (Bel was a Celtic and Gaelic Deity). It is a fire festival that celebrates the coming of summer and the fertility of the coming year. Celtic festivals often tied in with the needs of the community.

    In springtime, at the beginning of the farming calendar, everybody would be hoping for a fruitful year for their fields and hence also their families. Beltane rituals would often include courting: for example, young men and women collecting blossoms in the woods and lighting fires in the evening.

    These rituals would often lead to matches and marriages, either immediately in the coming summer or autumn. Beltane is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals; along witLughnasadh, Samhain and Imbolc - as shown on the Pagan Wheel on the right, courtesy of Shutterstock (licence paid).

    Tuesday 1st May was the annual Roman Festival of Bona Dea. In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (literally "the good goddess") was the goddess of fertility, healing, virginity, and women. She was the daughter of the god Faunus and was associated with supplying medicinal healing herbs in her temple garden. Bona Dea was also invoked for freedom from slavery; many of her worshippers were freed slaves and plebeians, and many were women seeking aid in sickness or for fertility. This Festival was celebrated by women only!

     

  • Friday 23rd November is the Full Reed Moon @ 05.41.

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel.

    To the left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards).

    Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. 

    See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Reed Moon(thoughtco.com). Reeds were used by the Celts to make wind instruments and at this time of year, as the wind blows through the dying reeds (they die back in winter), and the resulting eerie haunting sound was thought to be the souls of the departed on their final journey to the underworld. The Celts called this month Negatal (pronounced nyettle) and it's a time for magical relating to spirit guides, meditation, energy work and honouring the cycle of life - birth, death and re-birth.  It's also a good time for scrying and divination. The neo pagans sometimes refer to this month by it's alternative name of Elm Moon.

    Other names for a Full Moon in November are: Hunter's Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Corn Moon, Milk Moon, Flower Moon, Hare Moon (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Harvest Moon, or Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon, Moon before Yule or Long Night Moon (after the autumnal equinox)or Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Planting Moon, or Milk Moon, Rose Moon, Flower Moon, or Strawberry Moon (after the spring equinox). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live on Saturday 31st March is the Equinox Easter Alder Blue Full Moon (featuring the energies of the March 2018 Equinox Full Moon event plus instructions on Oil Pulling and Angela McGerr's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel). Plus, if you're interested, 'Has Easter been superimposed onto an earlier Pagan celebration Eostre?' 

  • Gabriel Harmony Angel Card

    Monday 21st January @ 05.12 (Sunday night/Monday morning) is the Full Moon and this is the first of three consecutive Supermoons. This month there's also a total lunar eclipse which can be seen from the UK/Europe, South & North America,Greenland, Iceland, western & northern Africa plus the Arctic area. If you are able to witness this total eclipse of the moon, it's worth making the effort because there won't be another one until 26th May 2021. Central and eastern Africa, Europe and Asia will see a partial eclipse. Full Moons at the time of eclipse are often called Blood Moons because the shadow of the earth over the moon makes it appear red. See timeanddate.com. The total eclipse takes place between 04.41 and 05.43 GMT. To convert GMT (Universal Time) to your local time

    This lunar eclipse follows a solar eclipse we experienced onSunday 6th January, and the period between the two has been a time for reflection and decluttering in all aspects of life.

    A Supermoon is when the moon appears larger in the sky because it is reaches the closest proximity to Earth (known as the perigee*) coinciding with the New Moon or Full Moon. Since the New Moon is only a sliver to the naked eye, the Full Moon Supermoons are much more of a visual treat, when the moon may appear up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than on any other Full Moon occasion. Although it may not seem all that noticeable to us and of course it will depend on good clear viewing conditions; however due to an optical illusion, it will always look bigger and more luminous when closer to the horizon.

    *The moon orbits around the Earth in an ellipse which takes just over 29 days, meaning that it reaches points in the year when it is at its closest (perigee, when it is about 363,000 km away) and furthest (apogee, when it is about 405,500 KM) from our planet. Those old enough might be reminded of Bed Knobs and Broomsticks when Angela Lansbury mentions the perigee and  apogee in one of her invocations!

    On 14th November 2016, the moon reached its closest to the Earth since 26th January 1948 and it won't come closer to us until 25th November 2034! More at Earthsky Website.

    Anyway, whatever the weather conditions, it's a fantastic excuse to get people of all ages outside in the fresh air and re-connecting with nature. Something our modern lifestyles and obsession with technology can distract us from doing...

    Between Full Moon and the next New Moon is considered as a good time energetically for detoxing the body. 

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel. Above left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards). Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Rowan Moon(thoughtco.com). The Rowan Moon is connected with the Celtic Goddess of home and hearth, mothers and families - Brighid, celebrated on Imbolc (1st February). Brighid (also kown as Bridie or Brigit) is a fire Goddess The Rowan is linked with personal power, success and astral travel and this was a popular time for Celts to perfiorm initiations. The Celts called this month Luis (pronounced loush) and its associated with protection Rowan leaves were used by the Norsemen on their protective rune staves). In some cultures, Rowan is planted around graveyards to prevent the dead from lingering.

    Other names for a Full Moon in January are: Old Moon, Moon After Yule (Northern Hemisphere) or Hay Moon, Buck Moon, Thunder Moon, Mead Moon (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Old Moon, Moon after Yule, Snow Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon, Sap Moon, Crow Moon or Lenten Moon (after the Winter Solstice)or Thunder Moon, Hay Moon, Green Corn Moon, Grain Moon, Fruit Moon or Harvest Moon (after the Summer Solstice). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live from Sunday 20th January 2019.

     

  • Gabriel Harmony Angel Card

    Tuesday 19th February @ 15.53 Ash Full Moon and this is the second, and brightest, of three consecutive Supermoons.

    A Supermoon is when the moon appears larger in the sky because it is reaches the closest proximity to Earth (known as the perigee*) coinciding with the New Moon or Full Moon. Since the New Moon is only a sliver to the naked eye, the Full Moon Supermoons are much more of a visual treat, when the moon may appear up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than on any other Full Moon occasion. Although it may not seem all that noticeable to us and of course it will depend on good clear viewing conditions; however due to an optical illusion, it will always look bigger and more luminous when closer to the horizon.

    *The moon orbits around the Earth in an ellipse which takes just over 29 days, meaning that it reaches points in the year when it is at its closest (perigee, when it is about 363,000 km away) and furthest (apogee, when it is about 405,500 KM) from our planet. Those old enough might be reminded of Bed Knobs and Broomsticks when Angela Lansbury mentions the perigee and  apogee in one of her invocations!

    On 14th November 2016, the moon reached its closest to the Earth since 26th January 1948 and it won't come closer to us until 25th November 2034! More at Earthsky Website.

    Anyway, whatever the weather conditions, it's a fantastic excuse to get people of all ages outside in the fresh air and re-connecting with nature. Something our modern lifestyles and obsession with technology can distract us from doing...

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel - see the beautiful image of Gabriel (left) by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards). Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. See link for instructions onAngela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Snow Moon, was so named by the Native American tribes who named each moon to keep track of the months and seasons.  here isn't a standardised system however, as some tribes took a year to be 12 moon cycles, whilst others went with 13 moon cycles. Similarly some tribes worked with five seasons per year whereas others went with four. Some Native Americans identified it as the Snow Moon to symbolise the heavy snowfall and challenging hunting conditions at this time of year. American Farmers have adopted these titles so that they are still used today. (See article in the Telegraph for more on this).

    Similarly, the Celts also had names for each Full Moon of the year and associated each with a tree. This is the Ash Moon; one of Odin's names in Norse is Ygg, which also means Ash, with the World tree, Yggdrasil, being an Ash.  Odin's spear was made from this tree. The Celts called this month Nion (pronounced knee-un)The Druids, venerated all nature but the three most sacred trees to them was the Ash, Oak and Thorn. The Ash tree features a great deal in Irish and Scottish folklore (the latter also including the Rowan, a form of Mountain Ash).  In the 12th Century, Marie de France wrote one of her famous lais about the Ash. The Ash is associated with rituals (especially ocean rituals), magic and prophesy, making it a perfect choice for divining, prophetic dreams and spiritual journeying for focussing on the inner self. Indeed, traditionally, more tools were made from Ash than any other wood, because it's not only very strong but it also resists shock (better than other hard woods such as oak or beech) making it an ideal choice for tool handles.  Ash berries were placed inside a baby's cradle to prevent the child being replaced with a 'changeling'.  More about this at the Celtic Weirdness websiteI happily stumbled upon. You will also find information at (thoughtco.com)

    Other names for a Full Moon in February are: Snow Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Grain Moon, Sturgeon Moon, Red Moon, Wyrt Moon, Corn Moon, Dog Moon or Barley Moon (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Old Moon, Moon after Yule, Snow Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon, Sap Moon, Crow Moon or Lenten Moon (after the Winter Solstice i.e. Northern Hemisphere)or Thunder Moon, Hay Moon, Green Corn Moon, Grain Moon, Fruit Moon or Harvest Moon (after the Summer Solstice i.e. Southern Hemisphere). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend an oil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live from Sunday 20th January 2019.

     

  • Closeup of blackthorn aka sloe aka prunus spinosa sweden 20050924Wednesday 16th May is the Night of Lunantisidhe, a Celtic Festival honouring the fairy spirits of blackthorns. Permission is granted via Wikipedia to copy, distribute and/or modify this blackthorn image under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation Licence. 

    From the selkywolf.com website, which features extracts from 'A Witch's Guide to Faery Folk' by Edain McCoy, we learn that Lunantisidhe is a curious blending of the Latin word 'Luna' meaning 'moon' together with the Gaelic 'sidhe' which means 'faery'. They are the guardians of the blackthorn tree from which humans (and Leprechauns!) make shillelaghs, a walking stick indigenous to Ireland. 

    blackthorn lunatisidhe small

    These fairies are - according to an AngelFire site - 'Wizened little stick creatures with long arms and fingers for climbing between the thorns'. Their sole purpose for existing seems to be to protect the blackthorn trees from human encroachment. The only time they the tree is to pay homage to the Moon Goddess at the Esbats (a specifc Full Moon Wicca Ceremony which may have it's origins in Celtic folklore), perhaps explaining why their name has a lunar connotation. Image © Andy Paciorek, see other incredibly talented images at Andy's website.  Permission was received to use this evocative image via Andy's Facebook Pagein May 2016.

    According to another very informative site ecoenchantments.co.uk, unlike the majority of great mystic trees, the Blackthorn appears to be revered only in the British Isles (Celtic folklore of both Itish and Scottish tradition) with there being little or no association with the mythical traditions of other ancient civilisations.

    The Blackthorn, latin name Prunus Spinosa, is a tree of profound magical lore in the Celtic tradition. It is one of the designated Eight Chieftain Trees on the Ogham Tract, where its name is Straif (strife, said to be where the word came from in the English dictionary) and translates as ‘Increaser of Secrets.’  I feel it brings a whole new meaning to 'trouble and strife' the Cockney rhyming slang for wife!

    The Blackthorn is also know as sloe (after its fruit), sloe plum, snag, spiny plum, wishing thorn, faery tree, (dark) mother of the woods, pear hawthorn. Within the UK, the trees are an ancient, native pioneer species, with evidence that the fruits were eaten by early man. Blackthorn was used in Iron Age communities (c3400 yrs ago) as remains have been found, buried in a straw filled pit (believed to be used for ripening and preserving the bitter sloes) near Glastonbury in the Lake Village (recorded in a catalogue of findings by the excavator Arthur Bulleid).

    Blackthorn is also wellknown for its medicinal benefits, having been catalogues by both herbalists, John Gerard in 1597:  ‘The juice of sloes do stop the belly, the laske and bloodie fluxe, the inordinate course of womens terms, and all other issues of blood in man or woman.’

    Whilst Nicholas Culpeper, in 1653, recommends a decoction of the powdered bark of the roots, or of the fresh or dried berries as a cure for ‘lask of the belly , or stomach, or the bloody flux, and to ease the pains in the sides or bowels.’  He also recommended a distilled liquid of the flowers steeped in a highly honeyed mead, which he described as 'A most certain remedy, tried and approved, to ease all manner of gnawing in the stomach, sides and bowels, or any griping pains in any of them, to drink a small quantity when the extremity of the pain is upon them.’

    Undoubtedly Sloe Gin is still enjoyed today (made annually by my husband's Uncle Ron, aged 83, with sloes collected from the countryside).  Perhaps the continued popularity is due to its therapeutic benefits.

    As part of the Lunantisidhe festivities, holy trees marking sacred places and wells are acknowledged and new scraps of cloth are tied to their branches. 

     

  • Wednesday 24th October is the Samhain Full Ivy Moon @ 17.47.

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel.

    To the left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards).

    Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. 

    See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Ivy Moon(thoughtco.com). Samhain (Halloween, 31st October) is approaching and the year is coming to a close. The Ivy Moon marks the end of the harvest season, when most of the plants have withered but the evergreen Ivy carries on (even when its host has died), reminding us of the ongoing circle of life - life, death and rebirth. The Celts called the month Gort (pronounced go-ert) and it is seen as a time to banish fear and negativity from your life. Protect yourself from people, products and activities that are toxic to you. Ivy can be used in magical ceremonies for protection, healing, co-operation and for binding lovers together.

    Other names for a Full Moon in October are: Harvest Moon, Hunter's Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Egg Moon, Fish Moon, Seed Moon, Pink Moon, Waking Moon, (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Harvest Moon, or Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon (after the autumnal equinox)or Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Planting Moon, or Milk Moon, Rose Moon, Flower Moon, or Strawberry Moon (after the spring equinox). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live on Saturday 31st March is the Equinox Easter Alder Blue Full Moon (featuring the energies of the March 2018 Equinox Full Moon event plus instructions on Oil Pulling and Angela McGerr's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel). Plus, if you're interested, 'Has Easter been superimposed onto an earlier Pagan celebration Eostre?' 

  • Saturday 22nd December is the Solstice Elder Full Moon @ 17.50.

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel.

    To the left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards).

    Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. 

    See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Elder Moon(thoughtco.com). The Elder Moon marks a time of passing. The Elder bush damages easily but bursts back into life recovering promptly and so it is represents the coming New Year. The Celts called this month Ruish (pronounced roo-esh) and it's a time for renewal, rejuvenation and creativity, endings and beginnings and therefore still honouring the cycle of life - birth, death and re-birth.  Elder is used in magic lore to connect with the Faerie realms and nature spirits and is reputed to protect against negative entities. 

    Other names for a Full Moon in December are: Cold Moon, Moon Before Yule, Long Night Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Strawberry Moon, Honey Moon, Rose Moon (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Harvest Moon, Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon, Moon before Yule or Long Night Moon (after the autumnal equinox)or Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Planting Moon, Milk Moon, Rose Moon, Flower Moon, Strawberry Moon (after the spring equinox). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live on Saturday 31st March is the Equinox Easter Alder Blue Full Moon (featuring the energies of the March 2018 Equinox Full Moon event plus instructions on Oil Pulling and Angela McGerr's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel). Plus, if you're interested, 'Has Easter been superimposed onto an earlier Pagan celebration Eostre?' 

  • Thursday 1st August (or 19th July according to other sources) marks the Ancient Egyptian New year, traditionally marked the start of the Nile flood, started by the tears of Aset (Isis) over the death of Asar (Osirus).  The exact correlation of the Egyptian New year to the modern calendar is disputed, but I favour the linking with the heliacal rising of Sirius (dawn visibility of Sirius) as this star, known to the Egyptians as Sopdet (pronounced Soppday) was closely associated with Aset. 

    This year it's also the New Moon at 04.12. The New Moon Abundance Ritual should be carried out within 24 hours after the New Moon. It's important that it's after the new Moon, as the moon needs to be waxing to bring your dreams into fruition.  Being a New Moon and a New Year in ancient folklore, it would be a great time to create or revisit a Vision Board.

    shutterstock 114601966 Pagan wheelIn the Northern Hemisphere, this is also the Pagan Celebration of Lunasa (also known as Lammas), this is the start of the harvest, season of pregnancy, ripening, transformation and peace. This marks the height of the northern summer, when the Earth is most alive. Spellings vary for this Celtic/Gaelic Festival, which can be called Lughnasadh or Lúnasa (this latter 'Irish' spelling ironically appears closest to what most English-speakers would regard as the phonetic pronunciation — luu-na-sa), see atriptoireland.com for more on this. It is certainly the great festival of Lugh, or Lug, the great Celtic Sun King [Egyptian origins spring to mind here] and God of Light, with August is Lugh's sacred month.  As someone interested in etymology (the study of words) I am thinking that surely the word 'light' (especially with the peculiar silent 'gh' which came to be identified with a host of other rhyming words in English such as sight and fright) comes from 'lugh'?

    According to Celticdruidtemple.com, Lughnasa translates as "the games of Lugh" (pronounced as Lou or sometimes Luff) and alludes to the assembly for games coinciding with the first of three harvests. The month of August is apparently called Lughnasadh in Gaelic and it marks the last day of summer. This was a specifically Gaelic holiday and many of the other Celtic cultures also celebrate an autumn festival known by a range of names.  As Beltaine on 1st May marks the start of summer - Lughnasa marks the end of summer. Lughnasa is historically linked with Lugh, a leading Celtic deity and hero. These games with a bull sacrifice and major feast [with interesting echoes of the Egyptian Bull cult where Ausar (Osirus) was portrayed as a bull-headed deity), which I believe led to the unfortunate Mediterranean Bull Fighting tradition], and for some it was the start of a trial marriage.

    In some Wiccan and modern Pagan traditions, this festival for honouring Lugh is known as Lammas (see thoughtco.com). Allegedly, the word Lammas derives from an Old English phrase hlaf-maesse, translating as loaf mass. Lammas was an annual ritual, recogniing a community's dependency on what Thomas Hardy referred to as 'the ancient pulse of germ and birth.'"

    For a list of Joanna's forthcoming Harmony Healing events, see this recent Harmony Healing Event Update

    To receive email notification whenever a new Blog is posted (always headed with a title detailing the occasion or event so that you can choose whether to open it or not), sign up for the Harmony Healing e-newsletters at the top of the page. Joanna's Blog features New and Full Moon, meteor showers, eclipses and other meteorological events, interesting anniversaries, ancient festival dates plus notification of dates of numerological significance. Sometimes Blogs will appear on successive days and at other times there will be no messages for a while. The sender e-mail address is  (and the sender will show as Joanna Bristow-Watkins @ Harmony Healing). You may need add this email to your safe list and check your junk filter initially.

  • shutterstock 114601966 Pagan wheelWednesday 1st May is May Day and Beltane - a Celtic word meaning 'fires of Bel' (Bel was a Celtic and Gaelic Deity). It is a fire festival that celebrates the coming of summer and the fertility of the coming year. Celtic festivals often tied in with the needs of the community.

    In springtime, at the beginning of the farming calendar, everybody would be hoping for a fruitful year for their fields and hence also their families. Beltane rituals would often include courting: for example, young men and women collecting blossoms in the woods and lighting fires in the evening.

    These rituals would often lead to matches and marriages, either immediately in the coming summer or autumn. Beltane is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals; along witLughnasadh, Samhain and Imbolc - as shown on the Pagan Wheel on the right, courtesy of Shutterstock (licence paid).

    Wednesday 1st May was also the annual Roman Festival of Bona Dea. In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (literally "the good goddess") was the goddess of fertility, healing, virginity, and women. She was the daughter (or wife/sister depending on sources) of the nature-god Faunus and was associated with supplying medicinal healing herbs in her temple garden. Bona Dea was also invoked for freedom from slavery; many of her worshippers were freed slaves and plebeians, and many were women seeking aid in sickness or for fertility. This Festival was celebrated by women only, with men being barred from any knowledge of her mysteries!

    This would have comprised part of the six day Roman Festival of Floralia, commencing on 28th April (Julian Calender equivalent), detailed on my earlier Blog.

    For a list of Joanna's forthcoming Harmony Healing events, see this recent Harmony Healing Event Update.

     

Celestial Forecasts

Forthcoming Events and Workshops

Meet-ups (click on date for details),
Event Stands, talks & workshops:-

Surrey Networking, £10 (advance)
Surrey Therapists 2-hour Meetups
Wed 4th September, 7.30-9.30

LONDON Networking, £15 (advance)
London Therapists 2 hour Meetups
Wed 11th Sep, 7-9pm, Weekday Angels

Joanna's Courses & Workshops: -

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £200
Level 1 - Introduction

Thurs 22nd & Fri 24th August

Violet Flame of Amenti - £88 (£44 for RSE Graduates) 
Held in Heathfield, Sussex
Level 1 including attunement

Tuesday 3rd September

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £200
Egyptian Alchemy Healing Level 1 - Intro

Wed 4th & Tues 10th September

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £450
1 & 2 Practitioner Intensive

Wed 4th - Friday 6th September

Ankerwycke Yew Visit
Meditate at 2500+ year old tree
Sunday 8th September
Runnymede, Surrey

London Event (Southwark):
Awaken the Goddess (ATG) Festival
Saturday 12th October 10.00am - 6pm
Violet Flame of Amenti
Workshop, 11.00 am - 12.30 pm

All day entry: £20 advance; £25 door

 

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