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  • Sunday 13th October is the Full Ivy Moon @ 22.10.

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel.

    To the left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards).

    Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. 

    See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Ivy Moon(thoughtco.com). Samhain (Halloween, 31st October) is approaching and the year is coming to a close. The Ivy Moon marks the end of the harvest season, when most of the plants have withered but the evergreen Ivy carries on (even when its host has died), reminding us of the ongoing circle of life - life, death and rebirth. The Celts called the month Gort (pronounced go-ert) and it is seen as a time to banish fear and negativity from your life. Protect yourself from people, products and activities that are toxic to you. Ivy can be used in magical ceremonies for protection, healing, co-operation and for binding lovers together.

    Other names for a Full Moon in October are: Harvest Moon, Hunter's Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Egg Moon, Fish Moon, Seed Moon, Pink Moon, Waking Moon, (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Harvest Moon, or Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon (after the autumnal equinox)or Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Planting Moon, or Milk Moon, Rose Moon, Flower Moon, or Strawberry Moon (after the spring equinox). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    For a list of Joanna's forthcoming Harmony Healing events (including Forest Bathing+ at Newlands Corner, see this recent Harmony Healing Event Update

    To receive regular Blog updates (always headed with a title detailing the occasion or event so that you can choose whether to open it or not), featuring New and Full Moon, meteor showers, eclipses and other meteorological events, interesting anniversaries, ancient festival dates plus notification of dates of numerological significance, sign up for the Harmony Healing e-newsletters above or at the top of any page of this Harmony Healing website.  The nature of the Blog means that whenever there are several key dates in close succession, there will be frequent mailings. The sender e-mail address is j (and the sender will show as Joanna Bristow-Watkins @ Harmony Healing). You may need add this email to your safe list and check your junk filter initially.

  • Tuesday 12th November is the Full Reed Moon @ 13.37 UK time (GMT/UT).

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel.

    To the left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards).

    Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. 

    See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Reed Moon (thoughtco.com). Reeds were used by the Celts to make wind instruments and at this time of year, as the wind blows through the dying reeds (they die back in winter), and the resulting eerie haunting sound was thought to be the souls of the departed on their final journey to the underworld. The Celts called this month Negatal (pronounced nyettle) and it's a time for magical relating to spirit guides, meditation, energy work and honouring the cycle of life - birth, death and re-birth.  It's also a good time for scrying and divination. The neo pagans sometimes refer to this month by it's alternative name of Elm Moon.

    Other names for a Full Moon in November are: Hunter's Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Corn Moon, Milk Moon, Flower Moon, Hare Moon (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Harvest Moon, or Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon, Moon before Yule or Long Night Moon (after the autumnal equinox)or Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Planting Moon, or Milk Moon, Rose Moon, Flower Moon, or Strawberry Moon (after the spring equinox). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    For a list of Joanna's forthcoming Harmony Healing events (including Forest Bathing+ at Newlands Corner, see this recent Harmony Healing Event Update

    To receive regular Blog updates (always headed with a title detailing the occasion or event so that you can choose whether to open it or not), featuring New and Full Moon, meteor showers, eclipses and other meteorological events, interesting anniversaries, ancient festival dates plus notification of dates of numerological significance, sign up for the Harmony Healing e-newsletters above or at the top of any page of this Harmony Healing website.  The nature of the Blog means that whenever there are several key dates in close succession, there will be frequent mailings. The sender e-mail address is j (and the sender will show as Joanna Bristow-Watkins @ Harmony Healing). You may need add this email to your safe list and check your junk filter initially.

  • Map of Lower Egypt from WikipediaSaturday 22nd September is the Ancient Egyptian Ritual of the Neteru of the Two Lands

    The Two Lands, comprising of Upper & Lower Egypt, were presided over by the more successful Pharoahs. To the north was Lower Egypt (see map from Wikipedia) where the Nile fans into the Nile Delta.

    To the south was Upper Egypt, stretching to Aswan. The terms Upper and Lower Egypt are derived from the unusual geography of the Nile, which unlike most rivers, flows from south to north. Its origins are in the highlands of East Africa and it ends with the Nile Delta which drains into the Mediterannean Sea.

    Double Crown of Egypt image from WikipediaIn Spiritual lore, Upper and Lower Egypt could be said to represent the higher and lower self of the human body, and as such would need to be integrated on an annual basis with the help of the Neteru (Deities or Angelic Beings).

    The unification of Upper and Lower Egypt occurred in about 3000 BC, but the pschent - or double crown, see  Wikipedia image on the right - worn by the Pharoahs represented the combined regalia of both areas; the hedjet or White Crown for Upper Egypt and the deshret or Red Crown for Lower Egypt, each half representing sovereignty of one of the kingdoms.

    Established Ancient Egyptian tradition generally credits Menes (also known as Narmer), as the king who united Upper and Lower Egypt.

    On the Narmer Palette the king is depicted wearing the Red Crown in one scene and the White crown in another, and thereby showing his rule over both Lands.

    22nd September is also an alternative date for the Ancient Egyptian Ceremony of Transformation through Anpu (Anubis), though most sources list it as 4th September.  Joanna was interviewed by Linda Lang from ThoughtChange for their Mystical Side of Life Podcast series - see it on YouTube or for audio go to Anchor.

    anubis with sampleAn MP3 Meditation to overcome negative behaviour patterns is available from the Harmony Shop. The Egyptians believed that when a deceased soul entered the Halls of Amenti they would undergo a ceremony involving the metaphorical weighing of the heart (of the deceased) against Maat's feather, whereby the weight of the heart represents the degree to which the deceased lived in truth (that is how much he/she has sinned, the more he/she had sinned the heavier the heart). The meditation guides you through a journey with Anpu to see how you would fare if your heart was weighed against Maat's feather at this point in your life. This meditation was devised for 4th September, which being a Festival of Anpu would add emphasis, but can be used anytime.
     
    Anpu is the illegitimate child of Nebt-Het (Nephthys), born of her clandestine union with Asar (Osiris) but raised as the son of Set. Cast out when his true lineage was discovered, he became associated with dark and lonely places, a wanderer through the shadow-realm between life and death, Anpu therefore bearing witness to the darker side of mortality. He seeks out those lost souls who find themselves without guidance after their demise. He guards the Entrance to the Underworld, presided over by his true father Asar.  Hence, all who die will find themselves in the presence of this mysterious Jackel-headed God, who escorts them away from this world and to the gates of the next. 
     
    A laminated poster of Anpu (Anubis) by Jacqui Taliesin El Masri of Alkhemi.co.uk - shown on the right - is also available from the Harmony Shop along with other Egyptian Deity posters by Jacqui.

     

     

     

  • shutterstock 114601966 Pagan wheelTuesday 1st May is May Day and Beltane - a Celtic word meaning 'fires of Bel' (Bel was a Celtic and Gaelic Deity). It is a fire festival that celebrates the coming of summer and the fertility of the coming year. Celtic festivals often tied in with the needs of the community.

    In springtime, at the beginning of the farming calendar, everybody would be hoping for a fruitful year for their fields and hence also their families. Beltane rituals would often include courting: for example, young men and women collecting blossoms in the woods and lighting fires in the evening.

    These rituals would often lead to matches and marriages, either immediately in the coming summer or autumn. Beltane is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals; along witLughnasadh, Samhain and Imbolc - as shown on the Pagan Wheel on the right, courtesy of Shutterstock (licence paid).

    Tuesday 1st May was the annual Roman Festival of Bona Dea. In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (literally "the good goddess") was the goddess of fertility, healing, virginity, and women. She was the daughter of the god Faunus and was associated with supplying medicinal healing herbs in her temple garden. Bona Dea was also invoked for freedom from slavery; many of her worshippers were freed slaves and plebeians, and many were women seeking aid in sickness or for fertility. This Festival was celebrated by women only!

     

  • shutterstock 114601966 Pagan wheelTuesday 1st August (or 19th July according to other sources) is the Ancient Egyptian New year, traditionally marked the start of the Nile flood, started by the tears of Aset (Isis) over the death of Asar (Osirus).  The exact correlation of the Egyptian New year to the modern calendar is disputed, but I favour the linking with the heliacal rising of Sirius (dawn visibility of Sirius) as this star, known to the Egyptians as Sopdet (pronounced Soppday) was closely associated with Aset. 

    In the Northern Hemisphere, this is also the Pagan and Celtic Celebration of Lunasa, and the Gaelic Celebration of Lughnasadh. This is the start of the harvest, season of pregnancy, ripening, transformation and peace. This marks the height of the northern summer, when the Earth is most alive.

    This year, Joanna is holding her London Angel & Goddess Meet-up at 7.30-9.30pm at the Phoenix Artist Club in London. She will be introducing the Egyptian Deities featured in the Ennead and the concept of Khemitology (Egypytology according to oral tradition elders and wisdom keepers). 

    See London Angel & Goddess Meet-up for details and to book.

    Cost is £15 per person which includes a mini aura reading.

  • Solstice image licensed by DreamtimeSunday 23rd September at 02.54 is the Pagan Celebration of the Autumn Equinox, marking the time of harvest festival and fulfilment of summer; since, in the Northern Hemisphere, from now on there will be more dark than light for the rest of the year. 

    An equinox is an astronomical event when the plane of Earth's equator passes the center of the Sun. Equinoxes occur twice a year, around 21st March and 22nd/23rd September.

    At this point in the year, the night and day lengths are exactly equal, so it's a time of balance and a good time for introspection, look for what is good and worthwhile to become seeds for next year.

    Here in the UK, followers of the Druids, Pagans, Celtic and Gaelic traditions, as well as Wicca religion, gather at megalithic stone circles such as Stonehenge (Near Salisbury, Wiltshire) and Castlerigg (Keswick, Cumbria), to celebrate and watch the equinox sunrise.

    Sunday 23rd September is the start of Sukkot, the Jewish feast of the Tabernacles, it celebrates the harvest and the preservation of the Israelites in the wilderness.  

    Jewish feast dates begins at sundown of the night beforehand. Thus all holiday observances begin September.

  • Pagan image of SamoniosFriday 1st November starts the first month of the Celtic Year, called Samonios - 'Seed Fall'; mirroring the death/rebirth cycle of Asar (Osiris).

    It is thought that two Roman festivals became incorporated with Samhain - 'Feralia', when the Romans commemorated the passing of the dead, and 'Pomona', when the Roman goddess of fruit and trees was honoured. The Halloween tradition of bobbing for apples is thought to derive from the ancient links with the Roman fruit goddess, Pomona, and a Druidical rite associated with water. 

    This is also All Saints Day in the Christian calendar.

    The Samonios image above and text below, by Helen Benigni, are kindly taken with permission from the angelfire.com website.

    The month of SAMONIOS is a month of miraculous births beginning with the appearance of the twin stars of Castor and Pollux on the Eastern Horizon. These miraculously born twins, from an egg containing both mortal and immortal potential, bridge the gap between this world and the Otherworld with their appearance on the first quarter moon heralding the Holy Nights of Winter Solstice. Further into the month shortly after the third quarter of the moon, a trio of stars including Rigel, Betelguese and Castor march across the sky to illiminate this Oenach of light and birth.

    Literally translated as "seed fall," SAMONIOS is the month when the light of the Dagda, the seed of his loins, penetrates the womb of the earth and creates life. This light is symbolized by the sunrise of the Winter Solstice penetrating the inner chambers of the sacred mounds of the Neolithic peoples. At Newgrange, the sacred mound of the Bru na Boinne, the light of the Winter Solstice shines through a roof-box of white quartz for seventeen minutes to dramatically illuminate the cruciform chamber of the passage tomb. Here, the stone-carved geometric motifs common to trance states of shamanic ecstasy amplify the light in order that the observer may experience the light of life bestowed by the solar deity.

    This solar alignment initiates the light half of the year. Mistletoe is hung as a symbol of the immortal love that the good father, Dagda brought to Boand, the goddess of the Bru na Boinne. Oengus, the son of their union and the Lord of the Sid mound, guards the entrance to the Otherworld and immortal life. 

    Friday 1st November is also World Vegan Day.  In 1994, the event was established by Louise Wallis, then Chair of The Vegan Society, UK, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of coining the terms "vegan" and "veganism" and the founding of the organisation. November is nominated as World Vegan Month.

    For a list of Joanna's forthcoming Harmony Healing events, including Walton-on-Thames Healing Shares, 2-hour Central London evening mini-workshops and Forest Bathing+ Case Studies, see this recent Harmony Healing Event Update

    To receive regular Blog updates (always headed with a title detailing the occasion or event so that you can choose whether to open it or not), featuring New and Full Moon, meteor showers, eclipses and other meteorological events, interesting anniversaries, ancient festival dates plus notification of dates of numerological significance, sign up for the Harmony Healing e-newsletters above or at the top of any page of this Harmony Healing website.  The nature of the Blog means that whenever there are several key dates in close succession, there will be frequent mailings. The sender e-mail address is j (and the sender will show as Joanna Bristow-Watkins @ Harmony Healing). You may need add this email to your safe list and check your junk filter initially.

  • Friday 21st June at 16.54 is the Pagan Celebration of the Solstice, the moment when the sun enters the constellation of Cancer.  In the Northern Hemisphere, it's the Summer Solstice viewed as the triumph of light, the ecstatic culmination of the sun, yet the start of growing darkness.  Old traditions included: Making a bonfire on a hilltop, sing, drink, laugh and time of merry-making. Processions with torches and lanterns, rolling wheel down hill to mark the start of the sun’s descent, blessing cakes and wine, waiting for the dawn and greeting the sun when it rises, sleeping by a spring, rolling naked in the dew of the summer sunrise! 

    There will be thousands at Stonehenge to welcome in this turning point in the year. See https://stonehengetours.com/summer-solstice-celebrations.htm who also offer an inclusive coach tour from London and Bath for the Thursday sunset and the Friday sunrise. However, the year I went, when there were about 19,000 others, you could just drive there and enter free other than parking charges (£15 for a car, £5 for a motorobike) - if you;d like to make your own way and join in see English Heritage Stonehenge Solstice details.  It is an unforgetable experience.

    Last year around 30 of us gathered at the Clandon Wood Nature Reserve to watch the sunrise, my friends Olga and Gary will be hosting this again on Friday 21st June, between 04.00 & 07.00 (I will be there from around 4.30), details here: http://meetu.ps/e/GHMsp/158vg/f, but I think it will be full. Best to book early next year if you like the sound of it.

    Clandon Wood is near Guildford, Surrey.

    Here are pictures of last year. We enjoyed an amazing sunrise with a mystical cloud formation over the horizon.

    10

    9 8 6 4

    5

    3 Summer Sostice Clandon 2018 2 1

    After sunrise (officially 04.46 although it was getting light at around 4am), we enjoyed a guided meditation followed by a gong bath courtesy of Gary Evans and Olga Terebenina, Holistic Healing Therapy.  Photo below from last year when there were less of us.

    Post solstice sunrise gong session

     You might be wondering, did we all roll around naked in the dew afterwards?  If so, there are no photos...

    Thursday 20th June – Tuesday 2nd July is the Bootids Meteor Shower, predicted to be less active this year, peaking on Sunday 23rd June (see Blog entry under 23rd June). For advance notification (before the 23rd June Blog is published) see June Celestial Forecast

  • Friday 23rd November is the Full Reed Moon @ 05.41.

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel.

    To the left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards).

    Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. 

    See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Reed Moon(thoughtco.com). Reeds were used by the Celts to make wind instruments and at this time of year, as the wind blows through the dying reeds (they die back in winter), and the resulting eerie haunting sound was thought to be the souls of the departed on their final journey to the underworld. The Celts called this month Negatal (pronounced nyettle) and it's a time for magical relating to spirit guides, meditation, energy work and honouring the cycle of life - birth, death and re-birth.  It's also a good time for scrying and divination. The neo pagans sometimes refer to this month by it's alternative name of Elm Moon.

    Other names for a Full Moon in November are: Hunter's Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Corn Moon, Milk Moon, Flower Moon, Hare Moon (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Harvest Moon, or Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon, Moon before Yule or Long Night Moon (after the autumnal equinox)or Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Planting Moon, or Milk Moon, Rose Moon, Flower Moon, or Strawberry Moon (after the spring equinox). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live on Saturday 31st March is the Equinox Easter Alder Blue Full Moon (featuring the energies of the March 2018 Equinox Full Moon event plus instructions on Oil Pulling and Angela McGerr's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel). Plus, if you're interested, 'Has Easter been superimposed onto an earlier Pagan celebration Eostre?' 

  • Gabriel Harmony Angel Card

    Monday 21st January @ 05.12 (Sunday night/Monday morning) is the Full Moon and this is the first of three consecutive Supermoons. This month there's also a total lunar eclipse which can be seen from the UK/Europe, South & North America,Greenland, Iceland, western & northern Africa plus the Arctic area. If you are able to witness this total eclipse of the moon, it's worth making the effort because there won't be another one until 26th May 2021. Central and eastern Africa, Europe and Asia will see a partial eclipse. Full Moons at the time of eclipse are often called Blood Moons because the shadow of the earth over the moon makes it appear red. See timeanddate.com. The total eclipse takes place between 04.41 and 05.43 GMT. To convert GMT (Universal Time) to your local time

    This lunar eclipse follows a solar eclipse we experienced onSunday 6th January, and the period between the two has been a time for reflection and decluttering in all aspects of life.

    A Supermoon is when the moon appears larger in the sky because it is reaches the closest proximity to Earth (known as the perigee*) coinciding with the New Moon or Full Moon. Since the New Moon is only a sliver to the naked eye, the Full Moon Supermoons are much more of a visual treat, when the moon may appear up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than on any other Full Moon occasion. Although it may not seem all that noticeable to us and of course it will depend on good clear viewing conditions; however due to an optical illusion, it will always look bigger and more luminous when closer to the horizon.

    *The moon orbits around the Earth in an ellipse which takes just over 29 days, meaning that it reaches points in the year when it is at its closest (perigee, when it is about 363,000 km away) and furthest (apogee, when it is about 405,500 KM) from our planet. Those old enough might be reminded of Bed Knobs and Broomsticks when Angela Lansbury mentions the perigee and  apogee in one of her invocations!

    On 14th November 2016, the moon reached its closest to the Earth since 26th January 1948 and it won't come closer to us until 25th November 2034! More at Earthsky Website.

    Anyway, whatever the weather conditions, it's a fantastic excuse to get people of all ages outside in the fresh air and re-connecting with nature. Something our modern lifestyles and obsession with technology can distract us from doing...

    Between Full Moon and the next New Moon is considered as a good time energetically for detoxing the body. 

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel. Above left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards). Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Rowan Moon(thoughtco.com). The Rowan Moon is connected with the Celtic Goddess of home and hearth, mothers and families - Brighid, celebrated on Imbolc (1st February). Brighid (also kown as Bridie or Brigit) is a fire Goddess The Rowan is linked with personal power, success and astral travel and this was a popular time for Celts to perfiorm initiations. The Celts called this month Luis (pronounced loush) and its associated with protection Rowan leaves were used by the Norsemen on their protective rune staves). In some cultures, Rowan is planted around graveyards to prevent the dead from lingering.

    Other names for a Full Moon in January are: Old Moon, Moon After Yule (Northern Hemisphere) or Hay Moon, Buck Moon, Thunder Moon, Mead Moon (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Old Moon, Moon after Yule, Snow Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon, Sap Moon, Crow Moon or Lenten Moon (after the Winter Solstice)or Thunder Moon, Hay Moon, Green Corn Moon, Grain Moon, Fruit Moon or Harvest Moon (after the Summer Solstice). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live from Sunday 20th January 2019.

     

  • Gabriel Harmony Angel Card

    Tuesday 19th February @ 15.53 Ash Full Moon and this is the second, and brightest, of three consecutive Supermoons.

    A Supermoon is when the moon appears larger in the sky because it is reaches the closest proximity to Earth (known as the perigee*) coinciding with the New Moon or Full Moon. Since the New Moon is only a sliver to the naked eye, the Full Moon Supermoons are much more of a visual treat, when the moon may appear up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than on any other Full Moon occasion. Although it may not seem all that noticeable to us and of course it will depend on good clear viewing conditions; however due to an optical illusion, it will always look bigger and more luminous when closer to the horizon.

    *The moon orbits around the Earth in an ellipse which takes just over 29 days, meaning that it reaches points in the year when it is at its closest (perigee, when it is about 363,000 km away) and furthest (apogee, when it is about 405,500 KM) from our planet. Those old enough might be reminded of Bed Knobs and Broomsticks when Angela Lansbury mentions the perigee and  apogee in one of her invocations!

    On 14th November 2016, the moon reached its closest to the Earth since 26th January 1948 and it won't come closer to us until 25th November 2034! More at Earthsky Website.

    Anyway, whatever the weather conditions, it's a fantastic excuse to get people of all ages outside in the fresh air and re-connecting with nature. Something our modern lifestyles and obsession with technology can distract us from doing...

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel - see the beautiful image of Gabriel (left) by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards). Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. See link for instructions onAngela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Snow Moon, was so named by the Native American tribes who named each moon to keep track of the months and seasons.  here isn't a standardised system however, as some tribes took a year to be 12 moon cycles, whilst others went with 13 moon cycles. Similarly some tribes worked with five seasons per year whereas others went with four. Some Native Americans identified it as the Snow Moon to symbolise the heavy snowfall and challenging hunting conditions at this time of year. American Farmers have adopted these titles so that they are still used today. (See article in the Telegraph for more on this).

    Similarly, the Celts also had names for each Full Moon of the year and associated each with a tree. This is the Ash Moon; one of Odin's names in Norse is Ygg, which also means Ash, with the World tree, Yggdrasil, being an Ash.  Odin's spear was made from this tree. The Celts called this month Nion (pronounced knee-un)The Druids, venerated all nature but the three most sacred trees to them was the Ash, Oak and Thorn. The Ash tree features a great deal in Irish and Scottish folklore (the latter also including the Rowan, a form of Mountain Ash).  In the 12th Century, Marie de France wrote one of her famous lais about the Ash. The Ash is associated with rituals (especially ocean rituals), magic and prophesy, making it a perfect choice for divining, prophetic dreams and spiritual journeying for focussing on the inner self. Indeed, traditionally, more tools were made from Ash than any other wood, because it's not only very strong but it also resists shock (better than other hard woods such as oak or beech) making it an ideal choice for tool handles.  Ash berries were placed inside a baby's cradle to prevent the child being replaced with a 'changeling'.  More about this at the Celtic Weirdness websiteI happily stumbled upon. You will also find information at (thoughtco.com)

    Other names for a Full Moon in February are: Snow Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Grain Moon, Sturgeon Moon, Red Moon, Wyrt Moon, Corn Moon, Dog Moon or Barley Moon (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Old Moon, Moon after Yule, Snow Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon, Sap Moon, Crow Moon or Lenten Moon (after the Winter Solstice i.e. Northern Hemisphere)or Thunder Moon, Hay Moon, Green Corn Moon, Grain Moon, Fruit Moon or Harvest Moon (after the Summer Solstice i.e. Southern Hemisphere). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend an oil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live from Sunday 20th January 2019.

     

  • Shutterstock Pagan Wheel InageTuesday 31st October  traditionally marks the end of the harvest and the beginning of the Celtic and Pagan New Year. Samhain is Irish-Gaelic for 'the Summer's end', and is pronounced 'sow-in'. Samhain represents the death of the summer sun god, Lugh. This festival celebrates Nature's cycle of death and renewal.  This is traditionally known as Halloween. 

    Samhain is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals; along with Lughnasadh, Imbolc and Beltane. 

    In the Northern Hemisphere, Samhain heralds the beginning of Winter when the world starts to darken and the days are getting shorter; the 'dark half' of the year and the demise of the sun's uplifting influence.  The crone, personified as Cailleach - the Queen of the Winter - was reborn on every All Hallows Eve, returning to bring the Winter and protect animals through the coldest months. She turned to stone on Beltane Eve, Beltane being 1st May.

  • shutterstock 114601966 Pagan wheelThursday 1st February & Friday 2nd February is the Pagan Imbolc Ceremony, which is one of the four Great Celtic Festivals (between the Soltices and equinoxes), and which is a Wiccan, Gaelic and Druid Festival of Fertility and Growing Light. Imbolc (pronounced EE-molk) is the old Celtic word, the celebration is also known as Candlemas.

    It is sacred to the Goddess Brigit or Bridie, the power of the new moon, the Spring of the year, the flowing sea, corn dollies and the Great Moon Mother - Patroness of Poetry Making and Healing. Brigid is a triple Goddess, so she can be honoured in all her aspects, she is associated with fire, fertility, midwifery and the young. 

    The Imbolc Festival marks the passing of Winter and the first signs of Spring, with the emergence of new leaves and early flowers such as the snowdrop and crocus, as well as being the transition point of the threefold Goddess energies from those of the Crone to the Maiden. 

    Imbolc is a Fire Festival and it is traditional, at sunset, to briefly light every light in the house. Or light candles in each toom to celebrate the return of the sun. If it's been snowing, take time to enjoy walking in the snow, draw an image of the sun into the snow and relect on the sun's warmth.

    Traditional foods for Imbolc include anything dairy, including sour cream, as the Festival celebrated the calving season. Spicy and rich foods, such as curry or anything made with peppers, leeks, onion, chives and/or garlic are appropriate to celebrate the sun, together with mulled wine and anything containing raisins which also represent the sun.

    It's also a good time to clear clutter and look at what you want to achieve this year and ask Brigit's help in making it happen.

  • shutterstock 114601966 Pagan wheelFriday 1st February & Saturday 2nd February is the Pagan Imbolc Ceremony, which is one of the four Great Celtic Festivals (between the Soltices and equinoxes), and which is a Wiccan, Gaelic and Druid Festival of Fertility and Growing Light. Imbolc (pronounced EE-molk) is the old Celtic word, the celebration is also known as Candlemas.

    It is sacred to the Goddess Brigit or Bridie, the power of the new moon, the Spring of the year, the flowing sea, corn dollies and the Great Moon Mother - Patroness of Poetry Making and Healing. Brigid is a triple Goddess, so she can be honoured in all her aspects, she is associated with fire, fertility, midwifery and the young. 

    The Imbolc Festival marks the passing of Winter and the first signs of Spring, with the emergence of new leaves and early flowers such as the snowdrop and crocus, as well as being the transition point of the threefold Goddess energies from those of the Crone to the Maiden. 

    Traditional foods for Imbolc include anything dairy, including sour cream, as the Festival celebrated the calving season. Spicy and rich foods, such as curry or anything made with peppers, leeks, onion, chives and/or garlic are appropriate to celebrate the sun, together with mulled wine and anything containing raisins which also represent the sun.

    Imbolc altar 2019Imbolc is a Fire Festival and it is traditional, at sunset, to briefly light every light in the house. Or light candles in each toom to celebrate the return of the sun. If it's been snowing, take time to enjoy walking in the snow, draw an image of the sun into the snow and relect on the sun's warmth.

    It's also a good time to clear clutter and look at what you want to achieve this year and ask Brigit's help in making it happen.

    This morning, 9.30 - 11.30, four of us undertook a fire (invoking the Essene Angel Uriel) and water (invoking the Essene Angel Phuel) ceremony to bless some water from the Thames - and some local rain water. We had collected together a selection of crystals representing the elements fire and water, and made a little altar area using a coloured scarf. so We also performed a Druid Ceremony with the White Lady (another name for Bride/Brigid/Bridie) to bless the water. And at 4pm, I returned my river water to the Thames.

  • Closeup of blackthorn aka sloe aka prunus spinosa sweden 20050924Wednesday 16th May is the Night of Lunantisidhe, a Celtic Festival honouring the fairy spirits of blackthorns. Permission is granted via Wikipedia to copy, distribute and/or modify this blackthorn image under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation Licence. 

    From the selkywolf.com website, which features extracts from 'A Witch's Guide to Faery Folk' by Edain McCoy, we learn that Lunantisidhe is a curious blending of the Latin word 'Luna' meaning 'moon' together with the Gaelic 'sidhe' which means 'faery'. They are the guardians of the blackthorn tree from which humans (and Leprechauns!) make shillelaghs, a walking stick indigenous to Ireland. 

    blackthorn lunatisidhe small

    These fairies are - according to an AngelFire site - 'Wizened little stick creatures with long arms and fingers for climbing between the thorns'. Their sole purpose for existing seems to be to protect the blackthorn trees from human encroachment. The only time they the tree is to pay homage to the Moon Goddess at the Esbats (a specifc Full Moon Wicca Ceremony which may have it's origins in Celtic folklore), perhaps explaining why their name has a lunar connotation. Image © Andy Paciorek, see other incredibly talented images at Andy's website.  Permission was received to use this evocative image via Andy's Facebook Pagein May 2016.

    According to another very informative site ecoenchantments.co.uk, unlike the majority of great mystic trees, the Blackthorn appears to be revered only in the British Isles (Celtic folklore of both Itish and Scottish tradition) with there being little or no association with the mythical traditions of other ancient civilisations.

    The Blackthorn, latin name Prunus Spinosa, is a tree of profound magical lore in the Celtic tradition. It is one of the designated Eight Chieftain Trees on the Ogham Tract, where its name is Straif (strife, said to be where the word came from in the English dictionary) and translates as ‘Increaser of Secrets.’  I feel it brings a whole new meaning to 'trouble and strife' the Cockney rhyming slang for wife!

    The Blackthorn is also know as sloe (after its fruit), sloe plum, snag, spiny plum, wishing thorn, faery tree, (dark) mother of the woods, pear hawthorn. Within the UK, the trees are an ancient, native pioneer species, with evidence that the fruits were eaten by early man. Blackthorn was used in Iron Age communities (c3400 yrs ago) as remains have been found, buried in a straw filled pit (believed to be used for ripening and preserving the bitter sloes) near Glastonbury in the Lake Village (recorded in a catalogue of findings by the excavator Arthur Bulleid).

    Blackthorn is also wellknown for its medicinal benefits, having been catalogues by both herbalists, John Gerard in 1597:  ‘The juice of sloes do stop the belly, the laske and bloodie fluxe, the inordinate course of womens terms, and all other issues of blood in man or woman.’

    Whilst Nicholas Culpeper, in 1653, recommends a decoction of the powdered bark of the roots, or of the fresh or dried berries as a cure for ‘lask of the belly , or stomach, or the bloody flux, and to ease the pains in the sides or bowels.’  He also recommended a distilled liquid of the flowers steeped in a highly honeyed mead, which he described as 'A most certain remedy, tried and approved, to ease all manner of gnawing in the stomach, sides and bowels, or any griping pains in any of them, to drink a small quantity when the extremity of the pain is upon them.’

    Undoubtedly Sloe Gin is still enjoyed today (made annually by my husband's Uncle Ron, aged 83, with sloes collected from the countryside).  Perhaps the continued popularity is due to its therapeutic benefits.

    As part of the Lunantisidhe festivities, holy trees marking sacred places and wells are acknowledged and new scraps of cloth are tied to their branches. 

     

  • earth lighting equinox enMonday 23rd September at 08.50 is the Pagan Celebration of the Autumn Equinox, marking the time of harvest festival and fulfilment of summer; since, in the Northern Hemisphere, from now on there will be more dark than light for the rest of the year. In the Southern Hemisphere it's the Spring Equinox, heralding the longer days leading to the Summer Solstice.

    An equinox is an astronomical event when the plane of Earth's equator passes the center of the Sun. Equinoxes occur twice a year, around 21st March and 22nd/23rd September. 

    The image on the right, by Przemyslaw Blueshade Idzkiewicz (from Wikipedia), shows the illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox (vernal and autumnal). It is a view to eastern-hemisphere  showing  noon  in  Central European time zone (ignoring DST) on the day of equinox.

    At this point in the year, the night and day lengths are exactly equal, so it's a time of balance and a good time for introspection, look for what is good and worthwhile to become seeds for next year.

    Here in the UK, followers of the Druids, Pagans, Celtic and Gaelic traditions, as well as Wicca religion, gather at megalithic stone circles such as Stonehenge (Near Salisbury, Wiltshire) and Castlerigg (Keswick, Cumbria), to celebrate and watch the equinox sunrise.

    For a list of Joanna's forthcoming Harmony Healing events, see this recent Harmony Healing Event Update

    To receive regular Blog updates (always headed with a title detailing the occasion or event so that you can choose whether to open it or not), featuring New and Full Moon, meteor showers, eclipses and other meteorological events, interesting anniversaries, ancient festival dates plus notification of dates of numerological significance, sign up for the Harmony Healing e-newsletters above or at the top of any page of this Harmony Healing website.  The nature of the Blog means that whenever there are several key dates in close succession, there will be frequent mailings. The sender e-mail address is j (and the sender will show as Joanna Bristow-Watkins @ Harmony Healing). You may need add this email to your safe list and check your junk filter initially.

  • Wednesday 24th October is the Samhain Full Ivy Moon @ 17.47.

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel.

    To the left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards).

    Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. 

    See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Ivy Moon(thoughtco.com). Samhain (Halloween, 31st October) is approaching and the year is coming to a close. The Ivy Moon marks the end of the harvest season, when most of the plants have withered but the evergreen Ivy carries on (even when its host has died), reminding us of the ongoing circle of life - life, death and rebirth. The Celts called the month Gort (pronounced go-ert) and it is seen as a time to banish fear and negativity from your life. Protect yourself from people, products and activities that are toxic to you. Ivy can be used in magical ceremonies for protection, healing, co-operation and for binding lovers together.

    Other names for a Full Moon in October are: Harvest Moon, Hunter's Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Egg Moon, Fish Moon, Seed Moon, Pink Moon, Waking Moon, (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Harvest Moon, or Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon (after the autumnal equinox)or Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Planting Moon, or Milk Moon, Rose Moon, Flower Moon, or Strawberry Moon (after the spring equinox). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live on Saturday 31st March is the Equinox Easter Alder Blue Full Moon (featuring the energies of the March 2018 Equinox Full Moon event plus instructions on Oil Pulling and Angela McGerr's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel). Plus, if you're interested, 'Has Easter been superimposed onto an earlier Pagan celebration Eostre?' 

  • Shutterstock Pagan Wheel InageWednesday 31st October  traditionally marks the end of the harvest and the beginning of the Celtic and Pagan New Year. Samhain is Irish-Gaelic for 'the Summer's end', and is pronounced 'sow-in'. 

    Samhain represents the death of the summer sun god, Lugh. This festival celebrates Nature's cycle of death and renewal.  This is traditionally known as Halloween and is considered a time when the veil is thin between ours and other dimensions hence we can sense the presence of our ancestors more easily. 

    Samhain is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals; along with Lughnasadh, Imbolc and Beltane. 

    In the Northern Hemisphere, Samhain heralds the beginning of Winter when the world starts to darken and the days are getting shorter; the 'dark half' of the year and the demise of the sun's uplifting influence. 

    The crone, personified as Cailleach - the Queen of the Winter - was reborn on every All Hallows Eve, returning to bring the Winter and protect animals through the coldest months. She turned to stone on Beltane Eve, Beltane being 1st May.

    According to Edwin Courtenay

    On Halloween (Samhain), the veil between the worlds is thin because the old Celtic year is ending and the new Celtic year about to begin. This day and night - not one thing or the other - is a luminal space used by the Spirits of the Dead to visit those they love who they have left behind.

    In the Witches circle a door is opened in the East and the dead invited to walk through and commune with the living. In ancient days, plates were laid at the table and filled with food for the dead (a tradition still followed by some) the plate placed outside at the end of the night for the phantoms to feast on. On this day candles are lit and the loved ones gone before are remembered, grieved and loved. On this night the Horned Lord of the Witches rides with his ghostly troupe rescuing the lost and Earth bound Souls seeking peace.

    The ghosts of Halloween are not Gouls and monsters but our relatives and friends, come not to terrify but to love. Welcome them then and share this night together and know that there is nothing to fear from the dead.

    Edwin also explains what is meant by the 'veil is thin':

    Midnight has always been known as the Witching Hour... but why?

    Midnight is a luminal space - not quite one day or the other but rather a space between, a betwixt between and therefore a space close to the Spirit world and the Gods! There are other luminal moments of course - dawn and dusk and also luminal spaces such as thresholds, archways, wells and lakes. Places that are natural gateways, that harbour unseen things (like the evil eye - which is why we lift brides over thresholds - so the evil eye doesn’t see them) and other powers!

    These moments are powerful then and the times when witches weave their spells - especially on Halloween night!!!

    Samhain (Halloween) seemed like an appropriate date for a mini Past Lives Workshop. If you are interested in reincarnation and/or past life readings and live near London, you might enjoy the London Angels, Nature & Keys to Wellbeing Meetup on Wednesday 31st October, at WeWork Waterhouse Square, London, EC1N 2SW 6.00-8.00pm, £25 (plus £1.50 admin fee if paid by PayPal). The theme is Do Past Lives Exist and will include a mini reading for those present.

  • Pagan image of SamoniosWednesday 1st November starts the first month of the Celtic Year, called Samonios - 'Seed Fall'; mirroring the death/rebirth cycle of Asar (Osiris).

    It is thought that two Roman festivals became incorporated with Samhain - 'Feralia', when the Romans commemorated the passing of the dead, and 'Pomona', when the Roman goddess of fruit and trees was honoured. The Halloween tradition of bobbing for apples is thought to derive from the ancient links with the Roman fruit goddess, Pomona, and a Druidical rite associated with water. 

    This is also All Saints Day in the Christian calendar.

    The Samonios image above and text below, by Helen Benigni, are kindly taken with permission from the angelfire.com website.

    The month of SAMONIOS is a month of miraculous births beginning with the appearance of the twin stars of Castor and Pollux on the Eastern Horizon. These miraculously born twins, from an egg containing both mortal and immortal potential, bridge the gap between this world and the Otherworld with their appearance on the first quarter moon heralding the Holy Nights of Winter Solstice. Further into the month shortly after the third quarter of the moon, a trio of stars including Rigel, Betelguese, and Castor march across the sky to illiminate this Oenach of light and birth.

    Literally translated as "seed fall," SAMONIOS is the month when the light of the Dagda, the seed of his loins, penetrates the womb of the earth and creates life. This light is symbolized by the sunrise of the Winter Solstice penetrating the inner chambers of the sacred mounds of the Neolithic peoples. At Newgrange, the sacred mound of the Bru na Boinne, the light of the Winter Solstice shines through a roof-box of white quartz for seventeen minutes to dramatically illuminate the cruciform chamber of the passage tomb. Here, the stone-carved geometric motifs common to trance states of shamanic ecstasy amplify the light in order that the observer may experience the light of life bestowed by the solar deity.

    This solar alignment initiates the light half of the year. Mistletoe is hung as a symbol of the immortal love that the good father, Dagda brought to Boand, the goddess of the Bru na Boinne. Oengus, the son of their union and the Lord of the Sid mound, guards the entrance to the Otherworld and immortal life. 

  • Saturday 22nd December is the Solstice Elder Full Moon @ 17.50.

    If you are an angel fan, the angel of the Moon is Gabriel.

    To the left is a beautiful image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from my sister Angel McGerr's A Harmony of Angels book (and Harmony Angel Cards).

    Both are out of print and collectible but we still have a few remaining copies via the Harmony Shop. 

    See link for instructions on Angela's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    At the time of the Full Moon the Sun and Moon are in opposition. The solar (sun) energy influences our masculine/yang archetypal attributes (our outer world) such as strength, courage, identity, self-esteem, expression, conscious beliefs and determination together with our logical outlook.  Whereas the lunar energy (moon) influences our femininely archetypal attributes (our inner world), such as our unconscious beliefs, hidden emotions, nurturing feelings, creativity and intuition. The Full Moon is a powerful and appropriate time to show gratitude for life and the riches and bounty bestowed upon us by Mother Earth (Gaia).

    The Celts had names for each Full Moon of the year, and associated each with a tree; this is the Elder Moon(thoughtco.com). The Elder Moon marks a time of passing. The Elder bush damages easily but bursts back into life recovering promptly and so it is represents the coming New Year. The Celts called this month Ruish (pronounced roo-esh) and it's a time for renewal, rejuvenation and creativity, endings and beginnings and therefore still honouring the cycle of life - birth, death and re-birth.  Elder is used in magic lore to connect with the Faerie realms and nature spirits and is reputed to protect against negative entities. 

    Other names for a Full Moon in December are: Cold Moon, Moon Before Yule, Long Night Moon (Northern Hemisphere) or Strawberry Moon, Honey Moon, Rose Moon (Southern Hemisphere). Names for the moon can also relate to the season, so this Full Moon could also be called the Harvest Moon, Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, Beaver Moon, Moon before Yule or Long Night Moon (after the autumnal equinox)or Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Planting Moon, Milk Moon, Rose Moon, Flower Moon, Strawberry Moon (after the spring equinox). Source = earthsky.org. 

    The time between any Full Moon and the next New Moon is a good time, energetically, to detox the body. As avoiding toxins is recommended for the Ivy Moon, detoxing might also be advisable. I recommend anoil pulling technique, with coconut oil, which must be from a glass container for best taste.

    See my Facebook Live on Saturday 31st March is the Equinox Easter Alder Blue Full Moon (featuring the energies of the March 2018 Equinox Full Moon event plus instructions on Oil Pulling and Angela McGerr's Angelic Meditation with Gabriel). Plus, if you're interested, 'Has Easter been superimposed onto an earlier Pagan celebration Eostre?' 

Celestial Forecasts

Forthcoming Events and Workshops

Meet-ups (click on date for details),
Event Stands, talks & workshops:-

Surrey Networking, £10 (advance)
Surrey Therapists 2-hour Meetups
Tuesday 3rd December, 7.30-10pm

LONDON Networking, £15- £25
London Therapists 2 hour Meetups
Wed 4th Dec, 6.30-8.30pm,London EC2N 3AR

Joanna's Courses & Workshops 
In date order: -

Awaken Your Avatar - £3.33
3:3:3 Numerology
Virtual Event via Zoom

Past Lives - £35
Tuesday 17th December

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £200
Egyptian Alchemy Healing Level 1 - Intro

Wed 18th & Thurs 19th December

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £450
1 & 2 Practitioner Intensive

Next course is 2020

Violet Flame of Amenti - £88 (£44 for RSE Graduates) 
Level 1 including attunement
Newxt course 2020

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