Free Healing Tips Video

Sign up for our FREE newsletters and you will receive a link to a self-healing tips video. Enter your name and email address below to JOIN OUR MAILING LIST.
Jo10 LoRes Sq

RomanDeities

  • Friday 15th March was the ancient celebration of Anna Perenna - Goddess of the Eternal Year in Roman tradition.  So that the circle could be completed, offerings were made to the Spirit of the Year.

    According to Roman mythology, Anna Perenna was Dido's sister who, after Dido's suicide, was driven from Carthage to Latium. She was carried off by Numicus (the God of a stream) having incurred the wrath of Aeneas's wife in Latium. Aeneas's servants follwed her tracks and discovered that she had metamorphosed into a water nymph.

    Eid Mar coinIn Roman tradition, 15th March is also the Ides of March, as well as a Festival to Jupiter. Shakespeare had a soothsayer warn Julius Caesar 'Beware the Ides of March' and reputedly he was indeed assassinated on 15th March 44 BC. 

    The illustration to the right (from the Wikipedia page for the Ides of March) shows a commemorative coin from Autumn of 42 BC, issued by Caesar's assassin Brutus, depicting the abbreviation EID MAR (Ides of March) under a Cap of Freedom between two daggers.

  • Thursday 15th March was the ancient celebration of Anna Perenna - Goddess of the Eternal Year in Roman tradition.  So that the circle could be completed, offerings were made to the Spirit of the Year.

    According to Roman mythology, Anna Perenna was Dido's sister who, after Dido's suicide, was driven from Carthage to Latium. She was carried off by Numicus (the God of a stream) having incurred the wrath of Aeneas's wife in Latium. Aeneas's servants follwed her tracks and discovered that she had metamorphosed into a water nymph.

    Eid Mar coinIn Roman tradition, 15th March is also the Ides of March, as well as a Festival to Jupiter. Shakespeare had a soothsayer warn Julius Caesar 'Beware the Ides of March' and reputedly he was indeed assassinated on 15th March 44 BC. 

    The illustration to the right (from the Wikipedia page for the Ides of March) shows a commemorative coin from Autumn of 42 BC, issued by Caesar's assassin Brutus, depicting the abbreviation EID MAR (Ides of March) under a Cap of Freedom between two daggers.

  • shutterstock 114601966 Pagan wheelTuesday 1st May is May Day and Beltane - a Celtic word meaning 'fires of Bel' (Bel was a Celtic and Gaelic Deity). It is a fire festival that celebrates the coming of summer and the fertility of the coming year. Celtic festivals often tied in with the needs of the community.

    In springtime, at the beginning of the farming calendar, everybody would be hoping for a fruitful year for their fields and hence also their families. Beltane rituals would often include courting: for example, young men and women collecting blossoms in the woods and lighting fires in the evening.

    These rituals would often lead to matches and marriages, either immediately in the coming summer or autumn. Beltane is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals; along witLughnasadh, Samhain and Imbolc - as shown on the Pagan Wheel on the right, courtesy of Shutterstock (licence paid).

    Tuesday 1st May was the annual Roman Festival of Bona Dea. In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (literally "the good goddess") was the goddess of fertility, healing, virginity, and women. She was the daughter of the god Faunus and was associated with supplying medicinal healing herbs in her temple garden. Bona Dea was also invoked for freedom from slavery; many of her worshippers were freed slaves and plebeians, and many were women seeking aid in sickness or for fertility. This Festival was celebrated by women only!

     

  • Bona Dea Roman girls playingTuesday 4th December is the Roman Festival of Bona Dea, this being a smaller festival that the one celebrated on 1st May but similarly for women only.  In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (literally "the good goddess") was the goddess of fertility, healing, virginity, and women. Image left of Roman girls playing is from Wikipedia and is attributed to Agnete [GFDL or CCBY 3.0], fromWikimedia Commons. 

    She was the daughter of the god Faunus and was associated with supplying medicinal healing herbs in her temple garden. Bona Dea was also invoked for freedom from slavery; many of her worshippers were freed slaves and plebeians, and many were women seeking aid in sickness or for fertility.  Her oracles were revealed only to females.

    Men were not just prohibited from Her secret festival, they not even allowed to know Her name, let alone utter it. There were other restrictions during the worship of Bona Dea: drinking either wine or myrtle was taboo and could not be mentioned by name throughout Her secret festival, probably because they were both considered very powerful due to their sacred association with Her.

     

  • Significant dates from ancient folklore; timings given are UK time (GMT+1)

    Monday 1st April is April Fool’s day. 

    Monday 1st April, in addition to being April Fool’s Day, is also the Roman celebration of Veneralia and Fortuna Virilis. Both celebrations seem loosely connected with Venus who is honoured on this day and whose advice is sought on matters of love.

    Thursday 4th April is Magna Mater in the Roman calendar.  This is the festival of the festival of Cybele, Phrygian Great Earth Mother. Her priests took on female clothes and identities to commemorate her son Attis, who was castrated and died of the wounds but was later resurrected.

    New Moon image cropped toghtFriday 5th April @ 09.52 is the Dark Moon.

    The New Moon Abundance Ritual should be carried out within 24 hours.

    Sunday 7th April is World Health Day.

    Sunday 14th April is Palm Sunday in the Christian Calendar this year.  Palm Sunday, also known as Passion Sunday, is the 6th Sunday of Lent  and the final Sunday before Easter. Traditionally it marks the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem. The name is believed to commemorate the placement of palm leaves on the road to soften the surface for the donkey on which he was riding.

    Friday 19th April is the Christian Festival of Good Friday, which is a Bank Holiday in the UK as part of the Easter break. This commemorates the day when Jesus was crucified. It was not called ‘Good Friday’ until 4th Century and may be a corruption of God’s Friday. 

    Saturday 20th April is Easter Saturday in the Christian Calendar.

    Sunday 21st April, this year, is also Easter Sunday, which is generally taken to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus three days after his crucifixion. Intriguingly, Easter Sunday is not a set date but is calculated according to the Lunar cycle, being the next Sunday after the first Full Moon following the Vernal (Spring) Equinox, so it can move around between 22nd March and 25th April. This points to the celebration being linked to an earlier Pagan celebration, which were all associated with seasons and moon cycles; further corroborative evidence being the name Easter – derived from the Pagan God Eostre; the Easter Egg – reminiscent of the Pagan egg to symbolise fertility and the Easter Bunny – a variation on the Pagan Hare, another ancient symbol of fertility and with a 28 day gestation period very linked to the lunar cycle. In Ancient Egypt the hare is a hieroglyph meaning ‘existence’. 

    Sunrise from Isis TempleMonday 22nd April is Easter Monday, which is Bank holiday in the UK.  In Egypt, the ancient festival of Sham El Nassim (literally meaning "smelling of the breeze") dates back to Pharonic times (about 2700 BC) although it is celebrated on the Coptic Easter Monday. It's not seen as a religious festival as it's a National Holiday for both Egyptian Christians and Muslims. Traditional activities include painting eggs, picnicking, and eating feseekh (fermented mullet).

    Image shows sunrise over the Nile from the Philae Temple. 

    See my Facebook Live 'Has Easter been superimposed onto an earlier Pagan celebration Eostre?' 

    Monday 22nd April is Earth Day, which is heralded as a pivotal opportunity for people, corporations and governments to join together to create a global green economy. It is hoped that coordinated efforts now will be recognized by future generations as a turning point.

    Monday 22nd (late) until dawn Tuesday 23rd April - Lyrids Meteor Shower. The Lyrids are an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at their peak. These meteors can produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds. This year the shower peaks on April 22nd & 23rd, although some meteors can be visible from April 16th - 25th. Look for meteors radiating from the constellation of Lyra after midnight.  Light pollution from the proximity of the Full Moon on the 26th April this year will not help viewing in 2019.  See EarthSky.org for more

    Tuesday 23rd April is St George’s Day in England, celebrating England's patron saint, St George. England's National Day is celebrated on the anniversary of his death, which is on April 23rd. According to legend, St George was a soldier in the Roman army who killed a dragon and saved a princess.  The English flag is the red Cross of St. George, which is widely displayed as a symbol of national identity. It's also supposedly Shakespeare's birthday and deathday. However, 23rd April is not a Bank Holiday.

    Friday 26th April @ 23.59 is the Easter Willow Full Moon.

    Between Full Moon and the next New Moon is considered as a good time energetically for detoxing the body.

    Click here for Angela McGerr's Full Moon Meditation with Gabriel.

    Image of Angel Gabriel (left) by Richard Rockwood, is taken from Angela McGerr's Harmony Angel cards; signed copies are available from the Harmony Shop.

    Sunday 28th April is the Roman fertility festival of flowers and crops called Floralia, that later developed into celebration of sexuality, and may have influenced the subsequent celebrations for Beltane and May Day.  Bright coloured clothes are worn (if any!), races and shows are performed.

    Tuesday 30th April, is the Pagan Eve of Beltane; celebrations begin with people dancing around the fire clockwise, singing. Sometimes two fires are set, and cattle are driven between the fires to purify them. Dew gathered from the grass at dawn is used in potions for luck and indeed it is believed to be lucky to roll naked in the dew!!!  On Beltane, it is traditional to drink from a well before sunrise. Wash in the morning dew, and adorn yourself with greenery. Watch the sun come up, dance round the Maypole, and otherwise abandon yourself to the season.  Round Full Moon Cakes are eaten and blackberry, elderberry, dandelion wine or cider is drunk. Sacred springs are visited and healing water is drunk. 

    Acknowledgments 

    Moonwise calendar 2019

    Celestial Forecast is compiled by Joanna Bristow-Watkins of Harmony Healing, using many sources but notably the Moonwise Calendar. Whilst considerable effort is made to ensure accuracy, this is not an exact science and sources are sometimes contradictory!

    Joanna is a Reyad Sekh Em® Egyptian Alchemy Healer and Teaching Mentor. She escorts occasional Private Access tours to Stonehenge (and to Avebury on the same day) plus occasional Harmony Journey Sacred Site Tours to Egypt, Ireland and UK from time-to-time.  She also runs various Meet-up groups in London and Surrey and the London & Surrey Alchemists Facebook Group.

    To receive email notification whenever a new Blog is posted (this will be titled with the theme so you can choose whether to open it or not), place your full name and email in the box at the top of the page.

  • Significant dates from folklore, lunar and meteorological activites this month in green
    Selected Events (Harmony Healing and other events as notified) in black

    Timings given are UK time (GMT+1), click here to convert to your time zone

    Monday 1st July, in Fasli tradition, is the Zoroastrian Rain Festival of Tir Jashan, dedicated to the star deities of Tir and Teshar.  Give bracelets made of the seven colours of the rainbow.  At the end of the festival go to a high place and throw them into the wind.  As the Festival is actually on the 13th of Tir, some Zorastrian traditions convert this to 4th July.

    Monday 1st July is also the Harmony Healing Healing Share, 7-9.30 pm in Walton-on-Thames.

    New Moon image cropped toght

    Tuesday 2nd July @ 20:16 is the New Moon and this tear it's a total solar eclipse, visible from the South Pacific, Chile and Argentina.  A partial eclipse will be visible from far southern parts of Central America and western and southern parts of South America.

    The New Moon Abundance Ritual should be carried out within 24 hours after the New Moon.

    Thursday 4th July is the Harmony Healing Do Past Lives Exist 2-hour London Meet-up

    Friday 5th July is the Harmony Healing Violet Flame of Amenti 6-hour full day course in Walton-on-Thames, Surrey.

    Wednesday 10th July is the Harmony Healing London Networking & Healing Share 2-hour London Meet-up

    Saturday 13th July, according to some sources, was the Ancient Egyptian Festival to celebrate the Birthday of Ra.  Since Ra was the God of creation this could be interpreted as the day man was created!  Ra was also associated with the Sun and healing so perhaps it is no coincidence that the Roman’s celebrated Apollo on the same (Equivalent) date. 

    Saturday 13th July in Roman Times was the culmination of the Games of Apollo.  As early as 212 BCE 13th July was the celebration of Apollo as the God of Healing (especially during wars) but this later extended into an 8 day festival ending on 13th July.  Apollo was associated with the Sun and his twin Diana (Goddess of Hunting) was associated with the moon.  Apollo became significant among the Romans when Augustus Caesar, as a young man, chose Apollo as his own god, and attributed his victory over Antony and Cleopatra to Apollo’s superiority over the Egyptian Deities!  Augustus is said to have described Apollo as: “Governor of Roman destiny; master of the sun; archer; augur; averter of pestilence; and giver of sound morals to the young.”

    Tuesday 16th July @ 22:39 is the Full Moon and there will be a partial lunar eclipse visible at moonrise in London as well as most of the rest of Europe (except the far north), as well as from South America, Africa, Australasia and most of Asia. At maximum eclipse well over half the moon will be in shadow. the main partial phase lasts from 21:01 to 23:59 (UK time = GMT/UT + 1).

    Between this date and the next New Moon is considered as a good time energetically for detoxing the body.

    Click here for Angela McGerr's Full Moon Angelic Meditation with Gabriel.

    Image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from Angela McGerr's Harmony Angel Cards.

    Tuesday 16th July, being the day of the Full Moon in July, it is also Guru Purnima (the Full Moon of the Gurus) in Hindu tradition. The day of full moon, Purnima, in the month of Ashadh of the Hindu calendar is traditionally celebrated as Guru Purnima by Hindus. On this day, devotees offer puja (worship) to their Guru. The Sanskrit root "Gu" means darkness or ignorance. "Ru" denotes the remover of that darkness. Therefore one who removes the darkness of ignorance is a Guru. It is a day for celebration and worship, a day on which the disciples remember and express their gratitude to the lineage of Gurus. Hindus believe that a Guru is necessary to make one understand the formless Divinity.  

    Tuesday 16th July is Asalhka Puja Day; a Buddhist commemoration of the Buddha's first public speech to five ascetics. He declared the middle way, the noble eight-fold path and the four noble truths upon which Buddhism is based. 

    Monday 22nd July was celebrated in the First Book of Common Prayer, 1549, as Saint Mary Magdalene’s Day in the Christian calendar.  When the Second Book of Common Prayer was published 3 years later in 1552, this feast day, amongst others was omitted. Early celebrations of Mary Magdalene's Feast Day included marriage symbolism such as creating your own healing oil blends "for the marital bed”, probably including oils such as rose, sandalwood, and ylang ylang.  Apparently the original feast day venerated her as a representative of the perfect wife (church liturgy recommended readings such as Proverbs 31:10-31), so it is a day to celebrate the Sacred Feminine, maybe plant something, sew something, cook something and, of course, love something. 

    Friday 26th July (or 13th July) is the Egyptian eve of the Epagomenal Days of celebration for the birthdays of their ancient major Deities. The exact correlation of the Egyptian New year to the modern calendar is disputed, but I favour the linking with the heliacal rising of Sirius (dawn visibility of Sirius) as this star, known to the Egyptians as Sopdet (pronounced Soppday) was closely associated with Aset. The celebrations began on the Eve of the Epagomenal Days - viewed this year as Monday 25th July, although some sources equate it to 13th July).  The following days marked the birthdays of the five children of the Egyptian Deity Nut.  Being dates of powerful Egyptian Energies these may prove ideal days for an Egyptian Energy Reyad Sekh Em 1-2-1 healing session.  According to myth, Tehuti (Thoth) enabled Nut to give birth to her five children [Aset (Isis), Ausar (Osiris), Set, Heru (Horus the elder) and Nebt-het (Nephthys)] by using his cunning to win a game of draughts with the moon. By winning a seventy second part of the moon's light, he managed to create five extra days (the Epagomenal days), which allowed Nut to give birth to her five children without breaking Ra's decree that her children could not be born on any existing calendar day. This myth more than any other is responsible for Tehuti (Thoth)'s role as a lunar deity.  

    Saturday 27th July (or 14th July), in the Egyptian Calendar, is the Birthday of Ausar (Osirus).  See the entry under 26th July for the full story.

    Sunday 28th July (or 15th July), in the Egyptian Calendar, is the Birthday of Heru (Horus). See the entry under 26th July for the full story.

    Monday 29th July (or 16th July), in the Egyptian Calendar, is the Birthday of Set (Seth). See the entry under 26th July for the full story.

    Tuesday 30th July (or 17th July), in the Egyptian Calendar, is the Birthday of Aset (Isis). See the entry under 26th July for the full story.

    Wednesday 31st July (or 18th July) is the Egyptian Birthday of Nebt-het (Nepthys), see the entry under 26th July for the full story.

    New Moon image cropped toght

    Thursday 1st August  @ 04:12 (Wednesday night/ Thursday morning) is the Lunasa or Lammas New Moon. 

    The New Moon Abundance Ritual should be carried out within 24 hours after the New Moon.

    Moonwise calendar 2019

    Acknowledgments

    Celestial Forecast is compiled by Joanna Bristow-Watkins of Harmony Healing, using many sources but notably the Moonwise Calendar. Whilst considerable effort is made to ensure accuracy, this is not an exact science and sources are sometimes contradictory!

    To receive email notification whenever a new Blog is posted  (always headed with a title detailing the occasion or event so that you can choose whether to open it or not), sign up for the Harmony Healing e-newsletters at the top of the page.  Joanna's Blog features New and Full Moon, meteor showers, eclipses and other meteorological events, interesting anniversaries, ancient festival dates plus notification of dates of numerological significance. Sometimes Blogs will appear on successive days and at other times there will be no messages for a while. The sender e-mail address is (and the sender will show as Joanna Bristow-Watkins @ Harmony Healing. You may need add this email to your safe list and check your junk filter initially.

    Joanna is a Reyad Sekh Em® Egyptian Alchemy Healer and Teaching Mentor. She escorts occasional Private Access tours to Stonehenge (and to Avebury on the same day) plus Harmony Journey Sacred Site Tours to Egypt, Ireland and UK from time-to-time. She also runs various Meet-up groups in London and Surrey and the London & Surrey Alchemists Facebook Group.

  • Significant dates from ancient folklore, lunar and meteorological activites this month in green
    Selected Events (Harmony Healing and other events as notified) in black


    Timings given are UK time (GMT+1), click here to convert to your time zone

    Moon Scarletts shot squareMonday 3rd June is the Dark Moon @ 11.02.  

    The New Moon Abundance ritual should be carried out within 24 hours after the New Moon.

    Monday 3rd June is also the Harmony Healing Healing Share in Walton-on-Thames.

    Tuesday 4th June is the Harmony Healing Connecting with Weekday Guardian Angels mini-Workshop, near Farnam, Surrey

    Wednesday 5th June is World Environment day, which has been celebrated annually since 1972. Over the years, the day has focused on such issues as acid rain, oceans, water, and green cities.

    Friday 7th June is the Chinese Dragon Boat Festival, also known as Duanwu Festival in Mandarin and Tuen Ng Festival in Cantonese. The Festival is to commemorate the Chinese patriot, Qu Yuan, who killed himself by jumping into the river Li in despair. He was desperate because his master refused to take his advice and he feared his country falling into the enemy's hands  It is on the fifth day of the fifth month of the Chinese calendar, which falls this year on Friday 7th June.  However, celebrations often take place on convenient weekends in the Western calendar - such as the London Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival which takes place this year on Sunday 30th June.

    Sunday 9th June, for those interested, is the UFO and the Paranormal Conference, Newport, Gwent (Wales). 

    Sunday 16th June is the Egyptian night, known as Leyleten-Nuktah, the Night of the Tear Drop. A miraculous tear-drop as Aset (Isis) began the mourning of her brother/husband Asar (Osirus), was believed to fall into the Nile causing it to rise and bring new life to the land. Sources vary as to whether this is 14th/16th/17th or 18th June; the date is actually the 11th day of the Ancient Egyptian month of Ba-oo-neh, so the confusion arises when trying to covert this to our Gregorian calendar.

    Sunday 16th June is Joanna's Introducing Khemitology Workshop at the London College of Psychic Studies.

    Monday 17th June @ 09.31 is the Solstice Full Moon.

    It's also known as the Strawberry Moon, Lotus Moon, Oak Moon, Cold Moon or Long Night’s Moon.

    Between Full Moon and the next New Moon is considered as a good time energetically for detoxing the body.

    Click here for Angela McGerr's Full Moon Meditation with Gabriel. 

    Image of Gabriel by Richard Rockwood from Angela McGerr's Harmony Angel Cards, last few new editions available from the Harmony Shop (signed by Angela).

    Wednesday 19th June is the Harmony Healing Introduction to Essene Angelology 2-hour London Meet-up

    Friday 21st June at 16.54 is the Pagan Celebration of the Solstice, the moment when the sun enters Cancer.  In the Northern Hemisphere, this is viewed as the triumph of light, the ecstatic culmination of the sun, yet the start of growing darkness.  Old traditions included: Making a bonfire on a hilltop, sing, drink, laugh and time of merry-making.  Processions with torches and lanterns, rolling wheel down hill to mark the start of the sun’s descent, blessing cakes and wine, waiting for the dawn and greeting the sun when it rises, sleeping by a spring, rolling naked in the dew of the summer sunrise! 

    Sunday 23rd June is predicted as the peak of the Bootids Meteor Shower; if they are visble at all this year.  Although they are not active every year, they can occur any time beiween Friday 21st June and Tuesday 2nd July. In 2019, with the Full Moon occurring on June 17th and Last Quarter on June 25th, the peak dates will span the time with heavy moonlight. From more northerly latitudes (including UK), however, the all-night twilight poses a greater problem for observers. More at theastronomer.org, including a map of the radiant point.

    Sunday 23rd June is the Chinese Dragon Boat Festival in  Milton Keynes. The Festival is to commemorate the Chinese patriot, Qu Yuan, who killed himself by jumping into the river Li in despair. He was desperate because his master refused to take his advice and hge feared his country falling into the enemy's hands  It is on the fifth day of the fifth month of the Chinese calendar, Friday 7th June (Celebrations in China take place then), but celebrations often take place on convenient weekends in the Western calendar.

    Monday 24th June is the Egyptian Festival of the Burning of the Lamps which was held at Sais (source Bibliotheca Alexandrina, p31, also available via Academia.edu). This is the third great festival in Sais to Aset (Isis). In an under-chapel beneath the temple, lamps were carried in procession around the coffin of Asar (Osiris). It was by the power of light, symbolising the life-giving power of the Moon, that Aset rekindled life in her dead husband. The exact date is actually the 13th day of the Ancient Egyptian month of Epeiph, so confusion arises when trying to covert this to our Gregorian calendar and some sources give variations especially 21st June.

    Monday 24th June is also Midsummers Eve and was considered magical in Cornwall and Ireland, when there was feasting, fires, songs, and dances. Bonfires were kindled on high hills to commemorate the high point of the year. Traditionally, the veil is thin between the dimensions housing the living and the dead at this time. This is also the Roman Festival of Fors Fortuna.  Forsis an ancient Roman Goddess of prosperity, good luck, and divine blessings. Her name means "She Who Brings", from the Latin verb fero, synonymous with abundance and success.  This seems to have merged with Fortuna, probably originally a Goddess of fertility, into the Goddess called Fors Fortuna, who was acknowledged as sometimes being fickle or wanton and representing Fortune as Goddess of luck or chance.  She was especially worshipped by slaves and commoners, as the Goddess who could bring about rags-to-riches transformations; with at least two dedicated temples in Rome being founded by former slaves in gratitude for their changed luck.

    Monday 24th/Tuesday 25th June is the Harmony Healing Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) Egyptian Alchemy Healing 2-day Introductory course.

    Wednesday 26th June is the Harmony Healing Violet Flame of Amenti 2-hour London Meet-up.

    Thursday 27th June is the Harmony Healing Past Lives Workshop with Past Life mini-readings, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey.

    Sunday 30th June is London Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival. The Festival is to commemorate the Chinese patriot, Qu Yuan, who killed himself by jumping into the river Li in despair. He was desperate because his master refused to take his advice and he feared his country falling into the enemy's hands  It is on the fifth day of the fifth month of the Chinese calendar, which falls this year on Friday 7th June (Celebrations in China take place then), but celebrations often take place on convenient weekends in the Western calendar.

    Sunday 30th June is also Asteroid Day. Asteroid Day was co-founded in 2014, by Dr. Brian May, astrophysicist and lead guitarist of QUEEN, together with Rusty Schweickart, Apollo 9 Astronaut, Danica Remy, President of B612 Foundation and filmmaker Grig Richters. Asteroid Day events take place annually on 30th June to mark the anniversary of the Tunguska impact in 1908. Its purpose is to expand the understanding of asteroids and to ensure that any asteroids which might ever have a direct impact on our planet are carefully monitored.

    Moonwise calendar 2019Acknowledgments

    Celestial Forecast is compiled by Joanna Bristow-Watkins of Harmony Healing, using many sources but notably the Moonwise Calendar. Whilst considerable effort is made to ensure accuracy, this is not an exact science and sources are sometimes contradictory!

    Joanna is a Reyad Sekh Em® Egyptian Alchemy Healer and Teaching Mentor. She escorts occasional Private Access tours to Stonehenge (and to Avebury on the same day) plus occasional Harmony Journey Sacred Site Tours to Egypt, Ireland and UK from time-to-time.  She also runs various Meet-up groups in London and Surrey and the London & Surrey Alchemists Facebook Group.

    To receive email notification whenever a new Blog is posted (this will be titled with the theme so you can choose whether to open it or not), place your full name and email in the box at the top of the page. 

     

     

  • Significant dates from ancient folklore; timings given are UK time (GMT+1)

    Wednesday 1st Mayis May Day andBeltane - a Celtic word meaning 'fires of Bel' (Bel was a Celtic deity). It is a fire festival that celebrates the coming of summer and the fertility of the coming year. Celtic festivals often tied in with the needs of the community. In springtime, at the beginning of the farming calendar, everybody would be hoping for a fruitful year for their fields and hence also their families. Beltane rituals would often include courting: for example, young men and women collecting blossoms in the woods and lighting fires in the evening. These rituals would often lead to matches and marriages, either immediately in the coming summer or autumn.

    Wednesday 1st Maywas the annual Roman Festival ofBona Dea.  In Roman mythology, Bona Dea (literally "the good goddess") was the goddess of fertility, healing, virginity, and women. She was the daughter of the god Faunus and was associated with supplying medicinal healing herbs in her temple garden. Bona Dea was also invoked for freedom from slavery; many of her worshippers were freed slaves and plebeians, and many were women seeking aid in sickness or for fertility.  This Festival was celebrated by women only!

    Saturday 4th May is Beltane Dark Moon @ 23.47This New Moon Abundance ritual should be carried out within 24 hours after the New Moon.

    Saturday 4th May, in 2019, is also the festival of theVeneration of the Thorn at which the Hawthorn is honoured. This is a festival of modern origin that may have been adapted from the Night ofLunantisidhe on Thursday 16th May, honouring the fairy spirits of Hawthorns (whitethorns as opposed to the blackthorns venerated at Samhain). Holy bushes and trees marking sacred places and wells are acknowledged and new scraps of cloth are tied to their branches. 

    eta aquarid showerSunday 5th and Monday 6th May is the the ETA Aquarid Meteor ShowerPredominantly, this is a pre-dawn shower, that is one where the meteors may occur in the dark hour before dawn. Image of the radiant point is taken from the EarthSky Website.

    The new Moon close to midnight on 4th May guarantees a darker sky.

    The best display will rain down on the mornings of the 5th (especially favourable because of the New Moon) and 6th May - just before dawn - but it's worth looking out for them on the morning of the 7th as well.

    Sunday 5th May, Ramadan Begins at midnight. Ramadan is the Islamic remembrance of the reception of the divine revelation by Muhammad as recorded in the Qur'an. Complete fasting is observed from sunrise to sunset for 30 days, until Tuesday 4th June.

    Thursday 9th Mayis the Roman Festival ofLemuria.  This involves a ritual by the Master (or Mistress) of the House with nine black beans(!) to honour theLemures – spirits of those who died unnatural or violent deaths.  I wondered if it was connected also to the ancient land of Lemuria and a possible belief by the Romans that the land may have been destroyed violently (legend says that, like Atlantis, a disaster such as volcanic eruption or flood caused its destruction).

    Tuesday 14th May is the Egyptian Celebration known as the Panegyric of Isis, when Aset (isis) found Asar (Osiris) and duly celebrated. Offerings of wine, bread and milk are made and traditionally Auset is praised for her gifts.  It is a happy time for celebrating quests in life. 

    Wednesday 15th Mayis the Ancient Roman Ceremony ofArgei.At this festival, 27human-shaped bundles of rushes, known as Argei are carried in an anti-clockwise procession through the city; possibly in a ritual undertaken as a substitute for human sacrifice.  Finall, the Vestal Virgins throw theArgei into the River Tiber from the Bridge of Sublicius.

    Thursday 16th May, honouring the fairy spirits of hawthorns. Holy bushes and trees marking sacred places and wells are acknowledged and new scraps of cloth are tied to their branches.

    Saturday 18th May @ 22.11 is Full Moon (Blue Moon - third Full Moon in a season with four Full Moons).  Between Full Moon and the next New Moon is considered as a good time energetically for detoxing the body. Click here for Angela McGerr's Full Moon Meditation with Gabriel.  

    Friday 24th Mayis the Romani and ChristianFestival of the Three Marys at Sainte-Maries-de-la-Mar, on the south coast of France.  Here landed Mary Magdalene, Mary Jacob (the sister ofOur Lady) and Mary Salome (mother of James and John). A local Chieftain, Sara the Kali, had a vision of their arrival and by spreading her cloak over the rough sea ensured their safe arrival.

    Monday 27th May is the Spring Bank Holiday Monday in the UK this year.

    Wednesday 29th May is the English Folk Festival ofOak Apple Day; held in honour of oak trees after Charles II escaped from Cromwell’s army by hiding in an oak tree. Oak leaves are worn until midday.  

    Acknowledgments

    Moonwise calendar 2019

    Celestial Forecast is compiled by Joanna Bristow-Watkins of Harmony Healing, using many sources but notably the Moonwise Calendar. Whilst considerable effort is made to ensure accuracy, this is not an exact science and sources are sometimes contradictory!

    Joanna is a Reyad Sekh Em® Egyptian Alchemy Healer and Teaching Mentor. She escorts occasional Private Access tours to Stonehenge (and to Avebury on the same day) plus occasional Harmony Journey Sacred Site Tours to Egypt, Ireland and UK from time-to-time.  She also runs various Meet-up groups in London and Surrey and the London & Surrey Alchemists Facebook Group.

    To receive email notification whenever a new Blog is posted (this will be titled with the theme so you can choose whether to open it or not), place your full name and email in the box at the top of the page.

  • isis with sampleSunday 12th August is the Day of the Light of Aset (Isis).

    On this day Aset (Isis) is celebrated with all forms of light including sun worship, during the day and candles at night. 

    Interesting that it is very close to the date for the Roman Festival of Diana, which no doubt was a development from the Egyptian Festival.

    Image (left) by Jacqui Taliesin El Masra (Alkhemi.co.uk) also available as a laminated poster from this site - see Harmony Shop.

    Monday 13th August, in Roman tradition, was the Festival of Diana, being the date upon which King Servius Tullius dedicated her shrine on the Aventine Hill in Rome in the mid-sixth century BCE.  Diana was the hunting goddess, associated with wild animals and woodlands. She later became a moon goddess, supplanting Luna; and the moon was an emblem of chastity. Oak groves were especially sacred to her. She was praised in poetry for her strength, athletic grace, purity, distinct beauty, and hunting skill.  Despite her virginal status, Diana was also a Goddess of Fertility.

  • Tuesday 20th March is the Egyptian Festival of Pelusia, with the Egyptian Goddess Isis (Aset) working her spring magic to ensure the flooding of the Nile later in the year, thereby guaranteeing a fruitful harvest. See Joanna's live Facebook Pelusia/Facebook video.

    Image of Isis (left), also known as Aset, is by Jacqui Taliesin El Masri of Alkhemi.com

    We do have Egyptian Deity Posters available for sale from the Harmony Shop.

    Accordng to findwords.info, in the Roman Empire, the Pelusia was a religious festival held on the 20th March to honour Isis (known as Aset to the indigenous Egyptians) and her child Harpocrates (known to the Egyptians as Heru and later called Horus by the Greeks). It would have coincided with the second day of the Quinquatria, the five-day festival dedicated to Minerva(see Blog entry for 19th March). It's not known when the tradition started because the holiday was not featured in the Roman calendar by 100 AD, but had been added by the reign of Marcus Aurelius (161–180 AD). 

    In the 6th Century AD, John Lydus, the Byzantine scholar, describes the festival as commemorating the mud (we would now know as the alluvial plain) caused from the flooding of the Nile. This ends hunger and drought and generates fertility.  It was thought to be represented by the birth of Harpocrates, who in Roman art is depicted emerging from mud bearing a Cornucopia (rather like the image of Lar featured on the 22nd February Blog entry).

    During the Pelusia, participants were sprinkled with water to obtain immunity from offenses to the gods (impunitas periurorum) and rebirth (regeneratio). The sprinkling is thought to recreate the symbolic effect of the flooding, indicating that  water from the Nile itself may have been used as a form of holy water as it was in other Isis ceremonies brought to Rome. Regeneratio was also used in connection with Baptism in Christian discourse of the time. 

    In Egypt, the Pelusia on 20th March, marked the beginning of the sailing season. The day was under the protection of Isis and Serapis (the Graeco-Egyptian version of Osirus combined with Apis, introduced by the Ptolemies in the 1st Century BC).

  • Wednesday 20th March is the Egyptian Festival of Pelusia, with the Egyptian Goddess Isis (Aset) working her spring magic to ensure the flooding of the Nile later in the year, thereby guaranteeing a fruitful harvest. See Joanna's live Facebook Pelusia/Facebook video.

    Image of Isis (left), also known as Aset, is by Jacqui Taliesin El Masri of Alkhemi.co.uk 

    We do have Egyptian Deity Posters available for sale from the Harmony Shop.

    Accordng to findwords.info, in the Roman Empire, the Pelusia was a religious festival held on the 20th March to honour Isis (known as Aset to the indigenous Egyptians) and her child Harpocrates (known to the Egyptians as Heru and later called Horus by the Greeks). It would have coincided with the second day of the Quinquatria, the five-day festival dedicated to Minerva(see Blog entry for 19th March). It's not known when the tradition started because the holiday was not featured in the Roman calendar by 100 AD, but had been added by the reign of Marcus Aurelius (161–180 AD). 

    In the 6th Century AD, John Lydus, the Byzantine scholar, describes the festival as commemorating the mud (we would now know as the alluvial plain) caused from the flooding of the Nile. This ends hunger and drought and generates fertility.  It was thought to be represented by the birth of Harpocrates, who in Roman art is depicted emerging from mud bearing a Cornucopia (rather like the image of Lar featured on the 22nd February Blog entry).

    During the Pelusia, participants were sprinkled with water to obtain immunity from offenses to the gods (impunitas periurorum) and rebirth (regeneratio). The sprinkling is thought to recreate the symbolic effect of the flooding, indicating that  water from the Nile itself may have been used as a form of holy water as it was in other Isis ceremonies brought to Rome. Regeneratio was also used in connection with Baptism in Christian discourse of the time. 

    In Egypt, the Pelusia on 20th March, marked the beginning of the sailing season. The day was under the protection of Isis and Serapis (the Graeco-Egyptian version of Osirus combined with Apis, introduced by the Ptolemies in the 1st Century BC).

  • st patricks Day by Diane PaganSaturday 17th March is St Patrick’s Day in Eire (Ireland). 

    St Patrick is credited with converting the Irish back to Christianity which had been abandoned under Roman rule.

    Saint Patrick is said to have used the Shamrock (three leaved clover) as a metaphor for the Christian Trinity. According to Wikipedia, the name shamrock comes from the Irish word seamróg, which is derived from the Irish word for clover (seamair) and means simply "little clover" or "young clover". 

    The Irish Shamrock downloadable image (see left) by Diane Pagan is from her  theimaginationbox.com website, where you will find many other creative projects to celebrate St Patrick's Day.

    Saturday 17th March was also Liberalia, this was the Ancient Roman Festival to celebrate the male coming of age!  In view of the statement above that Christianity which had been abandoned under Roman rule, I wonder if there is a connection that when Eire re-converted to Christianity they chose the day of the male coming of age as their date of celebration...

    Liberalia was the Roman Feast of Liber Pater (God of wine and fertility, especially seeds) and his consort Libera, and was held three days after the Ides of March (15th). The day was celebrated with ribald songs, processions of priests and elder priestesses - adorned with Ivy - and sacrifices, with masks being hung on trees.

    381px Lar romano de bronce M.A.N. Inv.2943 01 Lara God worshipped for CaristiaYoung Roman boys were given a lucky charm by their parents called a bulla praetexta, generally made of gold or leather, which was hung around their necks to ward off evil spirits. 

    When boys reached puberty (usually aged 14-16) this amulet would be removed and often placed on an altar dedicated to the Lares (Deities protecting the household and family, image right shows a statue of one of the Lares holdng a cornucopia), together with either a lock of the boy's hair or stubble from his first shave. Subsequently mothers' would retrieve them and keep them safe out of superstition, and they would be used for protection if the son was ever in public office or in a role involving any danger.

    Later in the ceremony the rites of passsage would continue with the fathers' taking their sons to the Forum to be presented as adult citizens, now with full adult rites including eligibilty to vote (if he met the statutory requirements of the time) and the authority to wear the pure white adult toga, as well as to marry.  See Romeacrosseurope.com for more information.

  • st patricks Day by Diane PaganSunday 17th March is St Patrick’s Day in Eire (Ireland). 

    St Patrick is credited with converting the Irish back to Christianity which had been abandoned under Roman rule.

    Saint Patrick is said to have used the Shamrock (three leaved clover) as a metaphor for the Christian Trinity. According to Wikipedia, the name shamrock comes from the Irish word seamróg, which is derived from the Irish word for clover (seamair) and means simply "little clover" or "young clover". 

    The Irish Shamrock downloadable image (see left) by Diane Pagan is from her  theimaginationbox.com website, where you will find many other creative projects to celebrate St Patrick's Day.

    Sunday 17th March was also Liberalia, this was the Ancient Roman Festival to celebrate the male coming of age!  In view of the statement above that Christianity which had been abandoned under Roman rule, I wonder if there is a connection that when Eire re-converted to Christianity they chose the day of the male coming of age as their date of celebration...

    Liberalia was the Roman Feast of Liber Pater (God of wine and fertility, especially seeds) and his consort Libera, and was held three days after the Ides of March (15th). The day was celebrated with ribald songs, processions of priests and elder priestesses - adorned with Ivy - and sacrifices, with masks being hung on trees.

    381px Lar romano de bronce M.A.N. Inv.2943 01 Lara God worshipped for CaristiaYoung Roman boys were given a lucky charm by their parents called a bulla praetexta, generally made of gold or leather, which was hung around their necks to ward off evil spirits. 

    When boys reached puberty (usually aged 14-16) this amulet would be removed and often placed on an altar dedicated to the Lares(Deities protecting the household and family, image immediately above from Wikipedia shows a statue of one of the Lares holding a cornucopia from Axatiana (now Lora del Rio) in Roman Spain, early 1st century AD (National Archaeological Museum of Spain), together with either a lock of the boy's hair or stubble from his first shave. Subsequently mothers' would retrieve them and keep them safe out of superstition, and they would be used for protection if the son was ever in public office or in a role involving any danger.

    Later in the ceremony the rites of passsage would continue with the fathers' taking their sons to the Forum to be presented as adult citizens, now with full adult rites including eligibilty to vote (if he met the statutory requirements of the time) and the authority to wear the pure white adult toga, as well as to marry.  See Romeacrosseurope.com for more information.

  • Lupercalia image from Wikipedia

    Friday 15th February is Lupercalia in Ancient Roman tradition. Apparently, this was the popular ceremony of fertility, featuring naked men running through the street!  I can’t see this catching on in the UK climate!  

    This image of the Lupercalia Festival in Rome by Adam Elsheimer (18/03/1578 – 11/12/1610) is taken from the Wikipedia entry for Lupercalia and shows men dressed as dogs (or possibly Wolves since Lupus meant Wolf) and goats, Cupid and other personifications of fertility. Supposedly, the specially nominated priesthood for the occasion were called the Luperci ("brothers of the wolf"), and during the fertility ritual they paraded the streets around Rome either naked, or near naked, carrying strips of leather which were used to thrash in the direction of gathered audience. It was believed that any pregnant ladies struck by the whips would have an easier birthing process and any other ladies, whether considered barren or otherwise,mwould be granted fertility. 

    Hence, some say this ceremony was the precursor for Valentine’s Day (see entry below for 14th February).

  • Cybele Getty Villa 57.AA.19 1Thursday 4th April is Magna Mater in the Ancient Roman calendar; the festival of Cybele, Phrygian Great Earth Mother. 

    Her priests took on female identities and clothing to commemorate her son Attis, who, following a castration, died of the wounds but was subsequently resurrected.

    Image of Cybele (left) is from Wikipedia (credit Marshall Astor - Flickr: Cybele-with-a-Portrait-Head, Public Domain) 

  • Cybele Getty Villa 57.AA.19 1Wednesday 4th April is Magna Mater in the Ancient Roman calendar; the festival of Cybele, Phrygian Great Earth Mother. 

    Her priests took on female identities and clothing to commemorate her son Attis, who, following a castration, died of the wounds but was subsequently resurrected.

    Image of Cybele (right) is from Wikipedia (credit Marshall Astor - Flickr: Cybele-with-a-Portrait-Head, Public Domain) 

  • Monday 24th June is Midsummers Eve and was considered magical in Cornwall and Ireland, when there was feasting, fires, songs, and dances. Bonfires were kindled on high hills to commemorate the high point of the year. Traditionally, the veil is thin between the dimensions housing the living and the dead at this time. 

    Fors Fortuna CarminaBurana wheelThis is also the Roman Festival of Fors Fortuna. Fors is an ancient Roman Goddess of prosperity, good luck, and divine blessings. Her name means "She Who Brings", from the Latin verb fero, synonymous with abundance and success.  This seems to have merged with Fortuna, probably originally a Goddess of fertility, into the Goddess called Fors Fortuna, who was acknowledged as sometimes being fickle or wanton and representing Fortune as Goddess of luck or chance. 

    She was especially worshipped by slaves and commoners, as the Goddess who could bring about rags-to-riches transformations; with at least two dedicated temples in Rome being founded by former slaves in gratitude for their changed luck. It also looks to have been the origin of the phrase Wheel of Fortune.

    The image [By Anonymous (Public domain), via Wikimedia Commons] shows how Fortuna governs the circle of the four stages of life, the Wheel of Fortune, in a manuscript of Carmina Burana (Latin for Songs from Beuern; where Beuern is short for Benediktbeuern).

  • Image of MinervaMonday 19th March is the Roman Festival of Quinquatrus (also known as Quinquatria), the name being derived from it happening the 5th day after the Ides of March. 

    This was a Festival dedicated to Minerva when women were accustomed to consult fortune-tellers and diviners.

    Both Festus and Varro indicate that the Quinquatrus was only celebrated for one day and hence ancient Roman religious calendars assign only one day to the festival.

     Ovid, however, states that it was a five day celebration, hence the name. Apparently, on the first day no blood was shed, but on the last four there were gladiator contests.

    For more, see Wikipedia on Quinquatrus and Minerva from where this Mosaic image of Minerva of the Peace was taken.

  • 381px Lar romano de bronce M.A.N. Inv.2943 01 Lara God worshipped for CaristiaFriday 22nd February is the Roman Festival of Caristia.

    This was a Feast Day occasion of family reunion, when Roman fathers would pay special attention to their families.

    It was a day of reconciliation when disagreements were to be set aside, but the satirical poet Ovid apparently suggested this would be best achieved by excluding family members who caused trouble.

    Families gathered together to dine and offer food and incense to the Guardian Deities, collectively known as Lares.

    The image (taken by Luis García [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons) shows a statue of Lar carrying a cornucopia from  the National Archeological Museum of Spain.

  • Monday 21st August is the Roman Festival of Consualia, to honour Consus, the god of counsel, and the one who protects the harvest, which was in storage at the time of the festival.  Mars, as a protector of the harvest, was also honoured on this day, as were the Lares, the household Gods that individual families held sacred.  During the celebration horses, mules, and assess were exempted from all labour, and were led through the streets adorned with garlands and flowers. Chariot races were held this day in the Circus Maximus, which included an odd race in which chariots were pulled by mules.

Celestial Forecasts

Forthcoming Events and Workshops

Meet-ups (click on date for details),
Event Stands, talks & workshops:-

Surrey Networking, £10 (advance)
Surrey Therapists 2-hour Meetups
Tues 6th August, 7.30-9.30pm
Wed 4th September, 7.30-9.30

LONDON Networking, £15 (advance)
London Therapists 2 hour Meetups
Tues 13th Aug,
3-pm, London walk

Tues 13th Aug, 7-9pm, Khemitian Egypt
Wed 11th Sep,
7-9pm, Weekday Angels

Joanna's Courses & Workshops: -

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £450
1 & 2 Practitioner Intensive

Wed 17th - Fri 19th July

Past Lives - £35
Thursday 25th July

Violet Flame of Amenti - £88 (£44 for RSE Graduates)
Level 1 including attunement
Thursday 1st August

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £200
Level 1 - Introduction

Thurs 15th & Fri 16th August

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £350
Level 2 - Practitioner

Tues 20th - Wed 21st August

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £450
Levels 1 & 2 Practitioner Intensive

Mon 19th - Wed 21st August

Violet Flame of Amenti - £88 (£44 for RSE Graduates) 
Held in Heathfield, Sussex
Level 1 including attunement

Tuesday 3rd September

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £200
Egyptian Alchemy Healing Level 1 - Intro

Wed 4th & Tues 10th September

Reyad Sekh Em (RSE) - £450
1 & 2 Practitioner Intensive

Wed 4th - Friday 6th September

Ankerwycke Yew Visit
Meditate at 2500+ year old tree
Sunday 8th September
Runnymede, Surrey

London Event (Southwark):
Awaken the Goddess (ATG) Festival
Saturday 12th October 10.00am - 6pm
Violet Flame of Amenti
Workshop, 11.00 am - 12.30 pm

All day entry: £20 advance; £25 door

 

Search

Warrior Woman

Interview with Barbara Niven

How I Can Help You