Joanna Bristow Watkins

RomanFestivalofLiberalia

  • Liberalia and St Patrick's Day 2018

    st patricks Day by Diane PaganSaturday 17th March is St Patrick’s Day in Eire (Ireland). 

    St Patrick is credited with converting the Irish back to Christianity which had been abandoned under Roman rule.

    Saint Patrick is said to have used the Shamrock (three leaved clover) as a metaphor for the Christian Trinity. According to Wikipedia, the name shamrock comes from the Irish word seamróg, which is derived from the Irish word for clover (seamair) and means simply "little clover" or "young clover". 

    The Irish Shamrock downloadable image (see left) by Diane Pagan is from her  theimaginationbox.com website, where you will find many other creative projects to celebrate St Patrick's Day.

    Saturday 17th March was also Liberalia, this was the Ancient Roman Festival to celebrate the male coming of age!  In view of the statement above that Christianity which had been abandoned under Roman rule, I wonder if there is a connection that when Eire re-converted to Christianity they chose the day of the male coming of age as their date of celebration...

    Liberalia was the Roman Feast of Liber Pater (God of wine and fertility, especially seeds) and his consort Libera, and was held three days after the Ides of March (15th). The day was celebrated with ribald songs, processions of priests and elder priestesses - adorned with Ivy - and sacrifices, with masks being hung on trees.

    381px Lar romano de bronce M.A.N. Inv.2943 01 Lara God worshipped for CaristiaYoung Roman boys were given a lucky charm by their parents called a bulla praetexta, generally made of gold or leather, which was hung around their necks to ward off evil spirits. 

    When boys reached puberty (usually aged 14-16) this amulet would be removed and often placed on an altar dedicated to the Lares (Deities protecting the household and family, image right shows a statue of one of the Lares holdng a cornucopia), together with either a lock of the boy's hair or stubble from his first shave. Subsequently mothers' would retrieve them and keep them safe out of superstition, and they would be used for protection if the son was ever in public office or in a role involving any danger.

    Later in the ceremony the rites of passsage would continue with the fathers' taking their sons to the Forum to be presented as adult citizens, now with full adult rites including eligibilty to vote (if he met the statutory requirements of the time) and the authority to wear the pure white adult toga, as well as to marry.  See Romeacrosseurope.com for more information.

  • Liberalia and St Patrick's Day 2019

    st patricks Day by Diane PaganSunday 17th March is St Patrick’s Day in Eire (Ireland). 

    St Patrick is credited with converting the Irish back to Christianity which had been abandoned under Roman rule.

    Saint Patrick is said to have used the Shamrock (three leaved clover) as a metaphor for the Christian Trinity. According to Wikipedia, the name shamrock comes from the Irish word seamróg, which is derived from the Irish word for clover (seamair) and means simply "little clover" or "young clover". 

    The Irish Shamrock downloadable image (see left) by Diane Pagan is from her  theimaginationbox.com website, where you will find many other creative projects to celebrate St Patrick's Day.

    Sunday 17th March was also Liberalia, this was the Ancient Roman Festival to celebrate the male coming of age!  In view of the statement above that Christianity which had been abandoned under Roman rule, I wonder if there is a connection that when Eire re-converted to Christianity they chose the day of the male coming of age as their date of celebration...

    Liberalia was the Roman Feast of Liber Pater (God of wine and fertility, especially seeds) and his consort Libera, and was held three days after the Ides of March (15th). The day was celebrated with ribald songs, processions of priests and elder priestesses - adorned with Ivy - and sacrifices, with masks being hung on trees.

    381px Lar romano de bronce M.A.N. Inv.2943 01 Lara God worshipped for CaristiaYoung Roman boys were given a lucky charm by their parents called a bulla praetexta, generally made of gold or leather, which was hung around their necks to ward off evil spirits. 

    When boys reached puberty (usually aged 14-16) this amulet would be removed and often placed on an altar dedicated to the Lares(Deities protecting the household and family, image immediately above from Wikipedia shows a statue of one of the Lares holding a cornucopia from Axatiana (now Lora del Rio) in Roman Spain, early 1st century AD (National Archaeological Museum of Spain), together with either a lock of the boy's hair or stubble from his first shave. Subsequently mothers' would retrieve them and keep them safe out of superstition, and they would be used for protection if the son was ever in public office or in a role involving any danger.

    Later in the ceremony the rites of passsage would continue with the fathers' taking their sons to the Forum to be presented as adult citizens, now with full adult rites including eligibilty to vote (if he met the statutory requirements of the time) and the authority to wear the pure white adult toga, as well as to marry.  See Romeacrosseurope.com for more information.

  • Wednesday 17th March, St Patrick's Day & Roman Festival of Liberalia

    St Patricks Day used 2021Wednesday 17th March is St Patrick’s Day in Eire (Ireland). 

    St Patrick is credited with converting the Irish back to Christianity which had been abandoned under Roman rule.

    Saint Patrick is said to have used the Shamrock (three leaved clover) as a metaphor for the Christian Trinity.

    Apparently, the name shamrock comes from the Irish word seamróg, which is derived from the Irish word for clover (seamair) and means simply "little clover" or "young clover". 

    Our Irish Shamrock was created by Antonia Skelton for Harmony Healing.

    Liberalia 17 MarchWednesday 17th March was also Liberalia, the Ancient Roman Festival to celebrate the male coming of age! 

    In view of the statement above that Christianity had been abandoned under Roman rule, I wonder if there is a connection that when Eire re-converted to Christianity they chose the day of the male coming of age as their date of celebration...

    Liberalia was the Roman Feast of Liber Pater (God of wine and fertility, especially seeds) and his consort Libera, and was held three days after the Ides of March (15th).

    The day was celebrated with ribald songs, processions of priests and elder priestesses - adorned with Ivy - and sacrifices, with masks being hung on trees.

    Young Roman boys were given a lucky charm by their parents called a bulla praetexta, generally made of gold or leather, which was hung around their necks to ward off evil spirits. 

    When boys reached puberty (usually aged 14-16) this amulet would be removed and often placed on an altar dedicated to the Lares(Deities protecting the household and family), together with either a lock of the boy's hair or stubble from his first shave. Subsequently mothers' would retrieve them and keep them safe out of superstition, and they would be used for protection if the son was ever in public office or in a role involving any danger.

    Later in the ceremony the rites of passage would continue with the fathers' taking their sons to the Forum to be presented as adult citizens, now with full adult rites including eligibilty to vote (if he met the statutory requirements of the time) and the authority to wear the pure white adult toga, as well as to marry.  

    By keeping traditions, communities retained a sense of harmony and connection, thereby bringing balance and wellbeing into their lives.

    Harmony Healing activities are aimed at bringing harmony and wellbeing into your life. 

    Two new interactive mentoring courses series started this month with Mindful Chakra Balancing & Unity Consciousness on Tuesday evenings on 11th March and Essene Angelology on Thursday evenings commencing 16th March. These modules are £66 each, late starts accommodated.

    If you are looking for spiritually enlightening activities during lockdown, which help to connect you with the lunar cycle, we have the nextvirtual healing circle later this month  on  Sunday 28th March, at 7.30-9.30pm (UK time = GMT), and costs £20 (+ £2 Paypal fee). During this session, we connect with other like-minded people and together we work through a mindful chakra balancing process using colours and etheric crystals, with the aim that all participants will experience a degree of unity consciousness. This activity serves as a good taster of my work in general and the virtual format of our Zoom based programme.

    If you would like to experience one of our spiritual offerings (meditation, reading, 1:1 healing, a Forest Bathing+ session or a full mentoring course), why not ask for a Harmony Healing gift voucherfor a birthday or other celebratory occasion? 

    A number of virtual courses are now ready, details on Harmony Healing Virtual Events. Currently, due to Coronavirus, most events will be virtual hence distant readings and healings are proving popular. We don't recommend giving a reading or healing to another person, without first checking whether it would be welcomed.

    Joanna offers distant intuitive readings (past life and/or aura readings) and distant 1-2-1 healings and virtual healing circles. We also have meditations available.

    To receive regular Blog updates (headed with a title detailing the occasion or event so that you can choose whether to open it or not), featuring New and Full Moon, meteor showers, eclipses and other meteorological events, interesting anniversaries, ancient festival dates plus notification of dates of numerological significance, sign up for the Harmony Healing e-newsletters above or at the top of any page of this Harmony Healing website. The nature of the Blog means that whenever there are several key dates in close succession, there will be frequent mailings. The sender e-mail address is (and the sender will show as Joanna Bristow-Watkins @ Harmony Healing). You may need to add this email to your safe list and check your junk filter initially.