Joanna Bristow Watkins

StGeorgesDay

  • Friday 23rd April - St George's Day & Shakespeare's Birthday

    220px Flag of England.svgFriday 23rd April is St George’s Day in England, celebrating St George, England's patron saint. The anniversary of his death, which is on April 23rd, is seen as England's national day.

    According to legend, he was a soldier in the Roman army who killed a dragon and saved a princess.  The flag of England is the red Cross of St. George, and this is widely displayed as a symbol of national identity.

    Surprisingly, 23rd April is not a Bank Holiday.

    William ShakepeareWilliam Shakespeare - long revered as Britain's, if not the world's, best known author and playwright, also died on 23rd April, but in 1616, in Stratford-upon-Avon, making this the 405th Anniversary.

    He was Baptised in Stratford on the 26th April 1564 and his birth date is not known but it is traditionally observed on 23rd April, Saint George's Day, indicating that he would have died on his birthday. 

    This date, which can be traced back to an 18th-century scholar's mistake, has proved appealing to biographers, it being considered somewhat poetic that he died on his 42nd birthday. 

    Shakespeare has 37 plays and 154 sonnets credited to him, but we don't really know whether he actually wrote them, or was just a merchant, land owner and occasional actor who either brokered the plays or was prepared to be acknowledged as the author to protect anonymity of those truly responsible.

    Certainly writing plays could be dangerous as any plot seen to reflect a political plot not appreciated by the Queen/King could be interpreted as treason.

    Many scholars argue, quite reasonably, that proof of Shakespeare’s authorship is largely circumstantial and sketchy at best; certainly he was better known in Stratford as a businessman [one documented view is that he brokered the plays] and not a playwright.  

    Celebratiing national and cultural heroes is a great way of uniting communities, bringing harmony into their lives.

    Harmony Healing activities are aimed at bringing harmony and wellbeing into your life. 

    If you are looking for spiritually enlightening activities following lockdown, which help to connect you with the lunar cycle, we have the next virtual healing circle later this month  on Monday 26th April, at 7.30-9.30pm (UK time = GMT+1), and costs £20 (+ £2 Paypal fee). During this session, we connect with other like-minded people and together we work through a mindful chakra balancing process using colours and etheric crystals, with the aim that all participants will experience a degree of unity consciousness. This activity serves as a good taster of my work in general and the virtual format of our Zoom based programme.

    The next RSE 1 module series starts 14th May with Violet Flame of Amenti and 17th May with Chakra Balancing, Axiatonal Alignment and Unity Consciousness.

    If you would like to experience one of our spiritual offerings (meditation, reading, 1:1 healing, a Forest Bathing+ session or a full mentoring course), why not ask for a Harmony Healing gift voucherfor a birthday or other celebratory occasion? 

    A number of virtual courses are now ready, details on Harmony Healing Virtual Events. Currently, due to Coronavirus, most events will be virtual hence distant readings and healings are proving popular. We don't recommend giving a reading or healing to another person, without first checking whether it would be welcomed.

    Joanna offers distant intuitive readings (past life and/or aura readings) and distant 1-2-1 healings and virtual healing circles. We also have meditations available.

    To receive regular Blog updates (headed with a title detailing the occasion or event so that you can choose whether to open it or not), featuring New and Full Moon, meteor showers, eclipses and other meteorological events, interesting anniversaries, ancient festival dates plus notification of dates of numerological significance, sign up for the Harmony Healing e-newsletters above or at the top of any page of this Harmony Healing website. The nature of the Blog means that whenever there are several key dates in close succession, there will be frequent mailings. The sender e-mail address is (and the sender will show as Joanna Bristow-Watkins @ Harmony Healing). You may need to add this email to your safe list and check your junk filter initially. 

  • St George's Day & Shakespeare's Birthday, 23rd April 2017

    220px Flag of England.svgSunday 23rd April is St George’s Day in England, celebrating St George, England's patron saint. The anniversary of his death, which is on April 23rd, is seen as England's national day. According to legend, he was a soldier in the Roman army who killed a dragon and saved a princess.  The flag of England is the red Cross of St. George, and this is widely displayed as a symbol of national identity. Surprisingly, 23rd April is not a Bank Holiday.

    William ShakepeareWilliam Shakespeare - long revered as Britain's, if not the world's, best known author and playwright, also died on 23rd April, but in 1616, in Stratford-upon-Avon, making this the 400th Anniversary.

    He was Baptised in Stratfiord on the 26th April 1564 and his birth date is not known but it is traditionally observed on 23rd April, Saint George's Day. 

    This date, which can be traced back to an 18th-century scholar's mistake, has proved appealing to biographers, it being considered somewhat poetic that he died on his birthday. Shakespeare has 37 plays and 154 sonnets credited to him, but we don't really know whether he actually wrote them, or was just a merchant, broker, land owner and occasional actor who either brokered the plays or was prepared to be acknowledged as the author to protect anonymity of those truly responsible.

    Certainly writing plays could be dangerous as any plot seen to reflect a political plot not appreciated by the Queen/King could be interpreted as treason. Many scholars argue, quite reasonably, that proof of Shakespeare’s authorship is largely circumstantial and sketchy at best; certainly he was better known in Stratford as a businessman and not a playwright.